Political And Social Effects Of The American Revolution

Superior Essays
American politics and social views cost a war to achieve. In order for the new American government to stay in place successfully the old one had to be thrown out and the new one given sovereignty. This independence and time for a new rising government came at the price of roughly 25,300 American lives during the American Revolution (“Number of Americans”). The Revolutionary War gave New England the power and want to set up a new government, as well, the revolution changed the way women were viewed in society. It started the first movements in the new world to give African Americans their rights’ back and had other various effects. The American Revolution was a vital event to the United States of America in establishing its modern democratic …show more content…
The colonies found this reason when Great Britain began taxing the colonies for the protection the British troops gave them during the French and Indian war (Gilje). The colonies’ argument was “no taxation without representation” (Williams). This was such a big problem for the colonies because they felt they were being unfairly treated by being taxed. When the taxes were decided to be put in place for the colonist, the colonist had no say in it. This is what really infuriated New England about the tax. The time period of events leading up to the war took place from 1764-1775 and is known as the “resistance movement”. The Intolerable Acts started off with the Stamp Act of 1765 (Gilje). This act required a stamp to be placed on all paper goods from newsprints to legal documents. The people of the colonies began refusing to buy the stamps and the act was later removed only to be replaced by more. The colonist would again refuse and rebel to any tax that was placed on them. Another event took place in Boston in 1770. This was set in motion on March 5 when Boston rioters and protesters came out to the streets at the sight of red-coats, or British troops, who were stationed in Boston and New York to enforce laws and maintain control. The …show more content…
George Washington was elected commander in chief of the Continental Army and was appointed by the Second Continental Congress (“American Revolution”). On April 19, 1775, British servicemen advanced to Lexington and Concord by the British Monarchies orders. They had been sent to arrest revolutionary minutemen commanders John Hancock and Sam Adams. They were also instructed to seize American arms and gunpowder. Minutemen were being instructed by the Massachusetts Patriots and earned their name because it was said they could be ready for battle in a minute. 70 minutemen waited at Lexington for British troops to arrive. After refusing the British direction to disassemble a gunfire was shot from one side. This led to an outbreak of shots leaving many American soldiers hurt or killed. British soldiers moved forward and eradicated Concord’s military stockpile where they were met with more American soldiers who forced them to retreat. The Revolutionary War ended up with more than 250 British deaths and less than 100 American deaths in the first day (Aboukhadijeh). This was the beginning of armed fighting and considered the start of the war. The Revolutionary War effected Georgia greatly. In 1779 through 1782, there were very consequential effects on the economy and society of Georgia. Georgia had become a goal for the British to try and take over because it was the youngest of the colonies and had high numbers of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The American Revolution

    • 1922 Words
    • 8 Pages

    These events started with the Stamp Act of 1765 that led to physical violence, intimidation, and even mob violence to impede the collection of the stamp tax. The British had just concluded a 7-year war that left a massive national debt, which led Brittan to see the colonies as a source of untapped revenue. Many colonists saw this as unconstitutional because they lacked representation in the parliament that had imposed this new tax. After the Tea Act of 1765 had been repealed the Chancellor of the Exchequer proposed a new act, Townshend Revenue Act. Under his proposed act a number of goods where taxed in order to raise revenue to pay the salaries of the colonial governors.…

    • 1922 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The British crown blamed this on the colonists, since the colonists were over in the Americas. They set up the Proclamation of 1763 which prohibited the westward movement of colonists past the Appalachian Mountains. Since the war started over westward expansion the colonists were not necessarily fond of this. The colonists didn’t like this because the colonies were becoming crowded. New laws were established in order for the colonies to pay off the war debt that had accumulated throughout the war.…

    • 1297 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Instantaneously ignited by the ‘Shot Heard ‘Round the World,’ the War of Independence was waged in the American determination of gaining freedom from its overpowering mother country. Several factors contributed to the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. Most prominently, the major contribution to the war originated from Great Britain spending a surplus of money and resources on the French and Indian War. Resultantly, taxes were enforced upon the people of the colonies in an array of different forms. This understandably developed fury and resentment among the colonists, as they had no form of representation within Parliament.…

    • 1217 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This law would require colonists to purchase a government-issued stamp for legal documents and other paper goods. This in its way the Prime Minister Grenville is fueled the hatred of the colonist to start a revolution. It was when the “Stamp Act” reached the colonies’ passed regulations denying the tax on the colonies just like an “Englishmen”, but that was not the end. Then came the colonist who fought like “Americans” in Boston, colonist rioted and destroyed the house of the stamp distributor. The tension between the colonist and England was…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In 1765, the British government passed another law raising taxes on the colonies. The Stamp Act, required that all paper products used in the colonies be taxed. Americans are now outraged with anger, it is one thing to tax sugar, something that not everyone uses, but, to tax paper, a necessity to most. A group of irate colonial businessmen and lawyers got together and formed the Sons of Liberty in Boston to protest the Stamp Act. This idea sprung all over the other colonies.…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Stamp Act Analysis

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The acts passed by the British generated angry and motivated colonists. The British were not intentionally trying to infuriate the colonies; they had to find ways to get themselves out of war debts. But for every British action on the colonists, colonials had an overwhelming animosity toward their homeland. The reoccurring taxing prompted the colonies to rebel against Britain in attempt to become their own independent country. Striving to reduce the smuggling of Sugar into the colonies from Caribbean islands that were not affiliated with them, Britain passed the Sugar Act in 1764.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Quartering Act Essay

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Quartering Act is the act which requires the colonial legislatures to provide weapons, foods, shelters and all other kinds of different supplies for British troops in North America in 1766 (David, The American Journey, page 122). Because of the strict taxation that English exert to America and increased resistance movement of people, the North American colonies have to enhance their military force to maintain the stability, which results in the lack of official troops at North America and the discontentment of citizens. Protest: This law was not widely accepted in all North American colonies. People from colonies cherish the land that they got from French by the war, so they were really angry about this act. (David, page 122).…

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Unfortunately there were rejections by the nine colonial legislatures and others and in March 1766 Parliament revoked it. Although the Stamp Act was revoked the British thought that the colonies had to pay the royal government in the colonies. The Townshend Duties of 1765 taxed imports which caused boycotts and smugglers. The Boston Massacre of 1770 also occurred when angry group of soldiers fired into a crowd killing five people. The Boston Tea Party of 1773 which was apolitical protest from the Sons of Liberty in Boston soon led to the first continental Congress in Philadelphia in 1774.…

    • 643 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In 1765, The Stamp Act created to make American colonists pay a new tax on every piece of printed paper they used in order to protect them. The Act was the first direct tax and so offensive to all colonists because it was set without any approval of the colonial legislatures. The Virginia House of Burgesses stood against this taxation by adopting four resolves of Patrick Henry. The resolutions indicated to declare that Americans should have the same rights as the English men, especially on the right to be taxed to their own representatives. The most powerful people of society such as lawyers and businessmen formed a group to strongly disagree about the Stamp Act, so they set many meetings to debate and to find a…

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, the British government as well as its King, began to tax the colonies without fair representation, placed absurd Acts to keep order over the colonists, stationed military in the colonies, and demanded the abolishment of the rights to assemble. Thus, the colonists had more than enough reasons…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays