How Did Mao Zedong Influence Society

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As the main leader of China during a period of violence, poverty, and a failed Communist revolution, Mao Zedong has immortalized himself as a villain of China’s past, but also as a contributor to China’s modern governing system. Burdened with the desire to see equality throughout China, Mao turned to the students of China to help him seize power and maintain control over all of its citizens through violent and abusive means. Although he brought a terror, death, and harm to China during his time as Chairman, Mao’s influence over his country did help serve as an example of how not to govern a country, eventually becoming a stepping stone towards today’s capitalist and more equal China. Evident from his early days as Chairman, Mao constantly …show more content…
His loosely held rein over China had broken, leaving it in a state of disorganisation, where most of the citizens only knew violence. Those students who had grown up in the Red Guard lacked a solid formal eduation, as most of their time had been spent either in the countryside working for no pay, or participating in attacks on those against the communist regime. Riots among the Red Guard were incredibly common, leaving destruction and injuries in their wake, as different groups of Red Guards fought for power. With no ranks like other military organizations, many members of the Red Guard were grappling for control over the rest of their comrades, and knowing no different, frequently resorted to violent means in order to gain respect. Factions were created among the Red Guards, and soon these groups became rivals in the fight to control major cities in China. Mao, during this time, made no attempt to stop the fighting. As the leader of the Red Guard, it should have been his responsibility to assist reorganizing the young people so order could be brought back to them. Instead, he chose one faction in each major Chinese city and funded them with guns, tanks, and other weapons so that they were able to overpower the opposing factions. With the arrival of firearms in the fighting between the Red Guard factions, it was not only the young members who were caught in the …show more content…
At least 3 million Chinese citizens were killed during Mao’s Cultural Revolution, and an estimated 100 million were permanently affected by it either, financially, emotionally, physically, or socially. Those of the Red Guard who had not chosen to leave China and opted to stay in the countryside eventually returned to the cities, but had issues becoming employed due to their violent role in the Cultural Revolution and their lack of formal education. A bitter grudge was held between the former Red Guard members and Mao, who had now stepped down from power, inspiring the people to take action. Acceptance of the violence that had taken place and a desire to never see it happen again led many of the former Red Guard members to take a strong interest in politics during the 1970s. Socialism became the new focus of China’s citizens, who wanted a truly democratic country where unity was encouraged, and equality was gained through supporting the lower class, not destroying the upper

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