Compare And Contrast China After 1911 Revolution

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Compare and contrast China before and after 1911 Revolution The late Qing reform was introduced in the early 20th century. The reform was totally a waste of time as the people started to realize that it was beyond the bounds of possibility for China to survive in the Qing Dynasty. Therefore, many people in China started joining the revolutionary movements led by Dr. Sun Yixian, and as a result, this led to the outbreak of the 1911 Revolution. However, during the Qing Dynasty and after 1911 Revolution, China was in chaos in both periods. In both periods, people suffered a lot. Although after 1911 Revolution, the situation of people living in China was comparatively much better than that of under the Qing Dynasty. Therefore, I am interested …show more content…
The new generation of Chinese intellectuals believed that Chinese traditional culture, Confucianism in particular, was the root of the weakness of their nation and it held back the political and technological developments. As a result, men were no longer required to have pigtails as they were ordered to remove them. Women were also free from restriction; they were free from foot binding. The new government also passed new education laws to allow women to receive education. Thus, it shows that the national status of women started to improve. All these social changes helped link Chinese civilization to western civilization, as the Gregorian calendar was adopted and the style of clothing was also changed, people no longer wore traditional clothing. Moreover, people were also allowed to voice their opinions. For example, the May Fourth Movement was held. It was China’s first anti-imperialist, cultural and political mass movement in 1915 to show their love for their country. After the May Fourth Movement, there was a modernization of thoughts, actions and values. For example, people rejected the traditional ethics, promotion of science and democracy was

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