Social Criticism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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Social Criticism is broadly used by many well-known authors to distinguish compositions that address particular issues. Authors that are known as satirists use social criticism to show irony. This prominent style plays a major role in literature as the author gain recognition for their motivation for writing their novel regarding about previous or current situations. Known to be a successful novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, is an inspiring novel that satirizes many aspects of society. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain utilizes the term social criticism by interpreting in relation to irresponsible fathers and slavery. In Mark Twain’s novel, he uses a character of an irresponsible father to illustrate …show more content…
If one’s son was going to school to learn how to read and write, they should be proud of their son. One should not be punished simply due to receiving an education. Instead, Pap disproves the idea of Huck attending school and wants to punish him for an ordinary activity. Pap wants Huck to be like his father, an uneducated, underprivileged and intoxicated individual. He reacts to Huck’s new life as wanting to become superior than anyone in his family. In Twain’s fictional novel, he purposely uses the word son, to reveal another sense of social criticism with the father and son relationship. As the reader reads the novel, the reader begin to realize that Pap never did what a father should do for their son. When Huck was younger, Pap abandoned him and never essentially took care of Huck. Therefore, he is not a real father that a son should have. He only returns to get Huck’s money and use him for his own will. Considered to be an additional revelation of irony, Twain describes about Pap’s refusal to let the government take away Huck. Pap explains to the judge that he went through all the trouble and anxiety to …show more content…
Twain uses the N word to serve a purpose of identification. One critic observes “if the readers observe intently to the “repulsive” phrase, we are able to view this phrase not solely a provoke to inhumanity, but particularly through the knowledge of the accurate view of American racism furthermore the author’s criticism of it” (Smith 1). Whites, including Huck, are conditioned to believe society’s view of slavery as right. The first time Huck made the decision to turn Jim in, he eventually backed out. Huck goes through an internal conflict with his conscience as it begins to bother and make Huck feel guilty, since he helps a slave be free. Society contradicts that slavery is right, and Huck’s actions are wrong. Huck tells himself that he should die for helping a slave escape. Eventually, Huck has accepted this view of slavery. Later on, Jim tells Huck that he is going to hire an abolitionist if he does not get his wife and two children back. Hearing this made Huck realize that “he wouldn 't ever dared to talk such talk in his life before” (Twain 82). Jim’s life has before been property and now, according to Huck, he believes that he is superior enough to be equal with whites. In general, blacks should be treated equally to whites. Huck comments that Jim is stealing children that belong to another man, and he does not recognize the children are Jim’s. Twain was proving a point about slavery

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