Social Change In China

744 Words 3 Pages
In the post-Maoist era, China has seen a transformation to various parts of its society, some argue these changes were done in order to Westernize the nation while others argue these changes will allow China to keep its overall structure intact. Throughout this unit we discussed social changes in contemporary Chinese society, especially in aspects of education, ethnicity, and gender were the focal points of transformation. Throughout this piece, these transformations and whether I believe if such transformations are making China lose its uniqueness will be discussed in order to have a better overall understanding of these changes while focusing on educational and gender treatment changes seen in this period. Following the Maoist era, …show more content…
Following the breaking of patriarchal tradition and the inclusion of women in the workforce under Mao’s rule, and the introduction of the “One Child Policy,” has been seen by many as a ‘westernization of China’. With the Maoist era allowing women into landownership and the ability to work outside of the home the idea of gender independence in China had seen a possible beginning; which was ended by Xi Jinping 's reign in which women began to be brought back to focusing on the homefront. This began to change when in 1970 Premier Zhou Enlai mandated China’s controversial “One Child Policy” in which parents were only legally allowed to give birth to one child in order to make sure the nation does not become overpopulated. (Fong, 2002) Through the usage of this policy in China, parents were forced into treating whichever gender child they birth as their heir, in which their one child would be granted the tools needed to succeed and become independent individuals. (Fong, 2002) With the removal of children competing for parental resources and education, this generation of daughters born under the infamous “One Child Policy” have been allowed to receive more equal treatment as they were the only possible heirs to some family …show more content…
This argument can be made off the way these changes are being applied and realized by China; in that the educational reforms are to better China’s place as a scientific civilization and the family reforms as a way to prevent starvation of their populace. China does not have ambitions to joining the ‘western’ world in my opinion, quite the contrary I believe China is using these methods in order to better their current socialist system to allow it to be dominant to the ‘western’ system. With more refinement of the Chinese Entrance Exam and working towards equality of gender, China aims to continue to better its nation as a powerhouse and future superpower; while it currently must work out the system to best handle and control its population to work towards its successful

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