Social Anxiety In Schools

Great Essays
Abstract
This paper focused on social anxiety and how it affects adolescents, emerging adults, and families as a whole. Social anxiety is very common in families and people who use social networking technologies. Social anxiety is a form of anxiety that is brought out in social situations in which could be humiliation or embarrassment. Social anxiety has more of an onset in childhood and will follow them while they grow up to be an adult (Helping Social Anxiety In High School). In the “Familial Accumulation of Social Anxiety Symptoms and Maladaptive Emotion Regulation” study it is stated that SAD (Social Anxiety Disorder) is a frequent disorder found in children and is carried with them into adulthood (Ashbrand, Svaldi, Kramer, Breuninger,
…show more content…
People who suffer from SAD tend to Fear and dread social situations even days or weeks in advance. Studies have shown that more than 35% of people who suffer from SAD experience the symptoms at least 10 years before the seek treatment. The cause of Social anxiety disorder can never really be narrowed down to one thing it is usually multiple factors at once all working together for example trauma, genetics, or family history with anxiety. Social anxiety affects more than 19 million people in America and is the third largest mental health disorder. SAD is a very common disorder (Helping Social Anxiety In High …show more content…
Their Hypothesis was “Maladaptive ER is also more prevelant in families that have anxious children” (Ashbrand et al,. 2016).Maladaptive ER strategies increase social anxiety in both mothers and children. “Mothers reporting Maladaptive ER may have difficulties supporting their child coping with social anxiety while simultaneously experiencing heightened levels of anxiety”( Ashbrand et al,. 2016). The Inception of the disorder usually occurs at a young age or in the adolescent years but the child will maintain the factors of SAD into their adults years. This study was made up by parents and children that were recruited through various advertisements. The symptoms of SAD were screened through an interview and they found 34 children that met the criteria for SAD and 28 children did not report and mental health history ( Healthy Controls, HC) 51 families agreed to the study (SAD: N=25, HC:

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Anxiety is the most common disorder in middle childhood; there are many different types of anxiety disorders children may be affected by. For this research paper I will be discussing what anxiety is in middle childhood, what causes anxiety in children, the different anxiety disorders that are common in middle childhood and treatment options for children affected by anxiety. Anxiety disorders…

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There are many types of mental health issues that plague the world and many people who suffer from these types of issues. They say that mental health can start from adulthood and onwards, but what if mental health problems and issues start manifesting at a younger age in schools , homes and our communities? What if children are becoming anxious and depressed by abuse and peer pressure in schools and other people are putting them in situations they don 't feel comfortable with. Bullying is the main cause of mental health like anxiety and depression in adolescent children worldwide caused by toxic environments, corporal punishment and the effects on the victims and the bullies later in life. Bullying is the easiest and more acceptable form of…

    • 1481 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    A recent study revealed that childhood emotional abuse might be a risk factor for developing an eating disorder. 76.3% of the bulimic women that participated in the study reported experiencing repeated instances of emotional abuse in their childhood (Groleau et al., 2012). Furthermore, emotional abuse can also trigger substance abuse in adolescents. Bullying, isolating, and rejecting a child can leave wounds in their hearts that seem impossible to heal from. Once an individual is introduced to the numbing effects of alcohol or drugs they begin to depend on these substances to cope with the hurt.…

    • 752 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    These children also show separation anxiety, with an increased need for proximity to the custodial parent. ¬According to Jolene Oppawsky, writer of The Nurse Sees It First: The Effects of Parental Divorce on Children and Adolescents, children of one to three years of age may also endure “psychosomatic reactions,” such as night terrors or tics. More disturbing, children experiencing a parental divorce between the ages of three to six years may imitate behaviors performed by their parents, such as yelling and fighting. They may also implement “themes of sadness, aggression, [and] death in their play”…

    • 827 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Alcoholic Father

    • 922 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Daughters that have alcoholic fathers are more likely to be neurotic and act out bad behaviors. Also, the family climate and the families support correlated with the daughter’s current life arrangements. Child abuse can create children to be pessimistic, and can create chaos in their everyday life. Harter and Vanecek (2000) conducted an experiment on cognitive assumptions and long term distress in child abuse survivors involving parental alcoholism. Child abuse can be correlated to alcohol abuse, because they both involve family dysfunction.…

    • 922 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    With this information it could be used to cause awareness for parents with high levels of stress, it lets them know that if they want to prevent possible aggression and attention problems in their child they need to find a way to ease their level of stress and also work on building a secure attachment with their child. Within the stage of childhood there also numerous factors that cause violence and aggression. Huessman, Moise-Titus, Podolski, and Eron (2003) examine the effects television violence has on children later in young adulthood. A longitudinal study was conducted with children from ages six to ten. The children were violent television viewers and were interviewed fifteen years later…

    • 1109 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Social Psychology

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This type of interpersonal relationship can begin as early as infancy. When a child is born, the mother creates a new interpersonal relationship with the child and can find this to be very stressful and develop a mood disorder (J. Hodges, November 3, 2016). In return an insecure attachment is formed between the mother and child. Ever so often, it is not the parent’s depression that causes the children to become depressed but the change in family environments that stems from the depression and causes mood disorders in…

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Describe Family Violence

    • 1052 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The financial and economic strains on a family can increase stress, which may lead parents to lash out at children. According to Landenburg and Campbell (2013), parents with a history of abuse have increased tendencies towards depression and multiple stress factors, which places them at a higher risk of harming their children (p.840). Parents who are abused as children face many challenges including how they overcome the past abuse. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012) identified a risk factor for family violence as “seeing or being a victim of violence as a child”(p.1) which has shown to have higher rates of abuse within their family dynamics. Another implication of child abuse is that many times school violence offenders are a result of poor family functioning and a history of ill-treatment (Center for Disease control and Prevention, 2013, p.2).…

    • 1052 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Overprotecting Parents

    • 1010 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Children of parents with anxiety disorders are more likely to develop anxiety problems than are children of parents without clinical levels of anxiety. In addition, studies have also demonstrated that parents— particularly, mothers—of children diagnosed with anxiety disorders suffer from a higher prevalence of anxiety disorders compared to parents of non-anxious children” (Cooper et al. 2006). The transmission of anxiety from parents to children can be explained by a variety of factors, including biological vulnerability, exposure to adverse life events and chronic stress, and different types of learning…

    • 1010 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Children are at great risk for emotional, sexual, and physical abuse by parents or guardians who use alcohol or other substances. Many adult children of substance users report years of silent trauma while growing up in an addicted home. Children become vulnerable to assuming the role of the family scapegoat and are frequently blamed for the substance user’s behaviors. Many personal characteristics frequently develop in children who are raised in a family where an adult abuses alcohol or other substances. Children frequently become fixated on order, become “perfectionistic,” feel different from their peers, become extra-responsible, have difficulty with age-appropriate activities, take themselves too seriously, and may be loyal despite proof that the loyalty is not deserved, or develop passive-aggressive ways of dealing with conflict.…

    • 1214 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays