Social And Emotional Skills In Early Childhood

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According to the Department of Health and Ageing (2010), fostering autonomy and the development of age-appropriate social and emotional skills is important in early childhood. Additionally, social and emotional skills help children understand their identity and form healthy relationships for future success. Subsequently, discovering a sense of identity and building healthy relationships are essential parts for children’s health and well-being. National Quality Standards [NQS] and the Early Years Learning Framework [EYLF] provide educators with learning outcomes to guide children in becoming independent and confident learners. This essay describes how Abraham Maslow’s (2016) hierarchy of needs, Albert Bandura’s (2010) social learning theory …show more content…
Children develop social and emotional skills at birth and continue throughout their life (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008a). More importantly, developing social and emotional skills are essential for children to become independent and confident learners (Early Childhood Australia, 2013). As mentioned previously developing social and emotional skills helps children develop strategies and support their mental health and well-being. Furthermore, children understand who they are as a person, and develop their identity within their family and community. This is stated in one of the five learning outcomes “children have a strong sense of identity’ (DEEWR, 2009). Educators use the EYLF and NQS to support and encourage children to develop social and emotional awareness during play (DEEWR, 2009). Educators achieve this when interacting with children and learning their common interests. Art rich learning experiences such as dance, art and music help children respond to each other’s creative desire and recognition of self-being (Venables, n.d.). Through play children use social and emotional skills to build strong relationships with educators and other children (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008b). Theorists Abraham Maslow (2016), Albert Bandura (2010), and John Bowlby (2014) discovered how childhood plays an important role in fostering children’s autonomy, and …show more content…
Attachment is defined by children seeking comfort from their parents when upset or harmed (Mcleod, 2009). Children benefit socially and emotionally from the quality of care received from secondary carers such as educators, grandparents and siblings (Johnston & Nahmad-William, 2014). Attachment response towards the child includes attending to the child’s needs as the strong connection between a parent and their child influences their development (Mcleod, 2009). This is similar to Maslow’s (2016) hierarchy of needs, as children develop a sense of security, and build on their social and emotional wellbeing, in care of their parents. Through observations, Bowlby (2010) discovered the relationships between the parents and their child is important for the success of their social and emotional cognitive development (Mcleod, 2009). Additionally, if a child is separated too early, it leads to intense distress and increases the child’s anxiety. Consequently, attachment is a unique human ability to form lasting relationships and maintain relationships with others over time (Swinburne, 2015). Furthermore, earliest relationships are powerful influences on the nature of later attachments (Johnston & Nahmad, 2014). Ultimately, educators provide children with emotional stability to support children’s well-being and help foster their autonomy and develop their

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