Social And Economic Impacts Of The Contraception Movement

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Various birth control methods have been around hundreds of years prior to the revolutionary contraception movement of the early 1900s. From cedar oil as a spermicide to condoms comprised of sheep intestines, people have been finding ways to limit pregnancies (Gibbs, Van Dyk, Adams). However, the contraception movement of the early twentieth century caused a spark in society. Women were vying for new and improved methods of contraception (Wardell 740). We must ask, ‘What were the social and economic impacts of the contraception movement in the early twentieth century?’ The contraception movement led to several impacts such as helping with the decrease in medical emergencies and deaths due to pregnancy; leading to a decrease in family size; assisting …show more content…
Margaret Sanger helped thousands of women by combating laws that controlled women’s access to birth control. Margaret Sanger’s birth control clinic in New York attracted women from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts (Wardell 740). Now thanks to her efforts women across the country have access to birth control, including myself. Women had many reasons to utilize birth control methods which led to quite a few impacts on society during the early twentieth century. The contraception movement led to several impacts such as helping with the decrease in medical emergencies and deaths due to pregnancy; leading to a decrease in family size; assisting in the decrease of financial strain placed upon families due to pregnancies; and an increase in the likelihood of women continuing their education and entering the workforce. These impacts can still be seen in today’s society. On a personal level, I can relate to using birth control because of the possible financial burden that may be placed upon me if I were to get pregnant and my wanting to pursue my education and gain employment soon

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