Snow Falling On Cedars Journey

1117 Words 5 Pages
Lawrence Durrell once said that “Journeys like artists are born not made. A thousand differing circumstances contribute to them, few of them willed or determined by the will- whatever we may think...”.Journeys is a term that implies travel, the notion of a journey can be either physical, inner or imaginative and can result in negative or positive outcomes. Journeys result in transformation of new insights, experiences, cultures and perspectives. Journeys that are undertaken by individuals display consequences and changes that aid in shaping an individual’s perspective on interpersonal relationships, personal identity and existential outlook. These ideas are exemplified in David Guterson’s novel Snow Falling on Cedars through conflicting perspectives …show more content…
In Robert Frost’s poem, “The Road Not Taken” through the conflicting perspectives on the two differing roads, readers are given an insight on the physical and inner journeys undertaken by the persona. Preconceptions, fixed ways of feeling and perceiving oneself can only be shifted through the encounters of life’s journey, in which an individual’s identity and relationships are challenged. ‘Snow Falling on Cedars’ is set on the island of San Piedro during the 1950’s, after the Japanese bombed pearl harbour, causing tension between the Japanese and Americans, instigating severe racial discrimination against the American Japanese descents. David Guterson exemplifies these encounters through the characterisation of Hatsue who is faced with dilemma of her identity being either Japanese or American. Hatsue’s relationship with Ishmael and the existing racial tension plays a key role in Hatsue’s detachment from her Japanese culture. Guterson uses highly emotive language to portray Hatsue's emotions “I don’t want to be Japanese!” emphasising her internal battle. In the dialogue between Hatsue and her mother, “But your blood- you are still Japanese” Fujiko makes it clear that there is …show more content…
Scout Finch is a key character in the novel who is a conformist to her communities biased preconceptions and prejudice of Boo Radley. The novel depicts her inner journey overcoming the prejudicial bigotry towards Boo Radley through the unexpected encounters she faces, challenging her assumptions and prejudice leading to self-maturation and understanding. Scout absorbs unwarranted conjectures of an individual she has never witnessed by believing stories ‘according to neighbuorhood legend,’ and those told by Miss Stephanie, ‘a neighbourhood scold.’ Harper Lee depicts Scouts unjustified assumptions using figurative language and vivid imagery to describe with detailed physical attributes which invite the readers to visualize Boo’s appearance and question his sanity. “Dined on raw squirrels and cats he could catch. There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face; his eyes popped, and he drooled most of the time.” The unexpected encounter during the night of Halloween where Boo saves scout from the murderous hands of Bob Ewell, Scouts childhood superstitions of a ‘malevolent phantom’ diminish as Scout comes to a realisation that Boo is a misunderstood individual in need of nurturing and care her newfound realisation causes her to embrace her father’s previous advice to demonstrate sympathy and

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