Smith's Yes, A College Education Is Worth The Cost?

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The debate about whether attending college is worth the money and time commitment is a pressing topic for both parents and high school graduates alike. With all the uncertainties and fears regarding the state of the economy and the unstable job market, parents and students have the right to question whether or not college is the right choice for them. Although attending college can be an expensive and time consuming endeavor, college is worth the money and time investment because, college graduates can earn more money throughout their working lifetime, it can help set up a family trend for future generations to attend college, it can provide increased job opportunities, and college graduates have a better chances of finding fulfillment in …show more content…
So not only is college beneficial for the student themselves, but it can help set up a family trend of attending college for future generations to come. A great example of this is given again by Smith in his essay “Yes, A College Education Is Worth The Cost,” when Smith writes about the time his grandfather dug up the family savings to send Smith’s father to college, which in turn led to Smith following in his father 's footsteps and attending college as well, which subsequently led to Smith 's own children also pursuing higher education. In other words, going to college and obtaining a college degree isn’t beneficial for the student themselves, but it can also help motivate and inspire the future generations to come, like their own children or grandchildren in attending college as …show more content…
Also, having a college degree gives students a better chance of finding a job and they are less likely to be unemployed. In “ Plan B: Skip College,” a op-ed piece written by Jacques Steinberg a senior editor for education initiative at The New York Times, Steinberg wrote, “People with college and graduate degrees face lower risks of unemployment, according to figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.” Also, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics in Rodney Smith 's essay, “Yes, A College Education Is Worth The Cost,” show that in 2010: 10.3% of people with only a high school diplomas were unemployed, while only 5.4% of people with bachelor’s degrees were unemployed, and only 1.9% of people with doctoral degrees were unemployed. These statistics help show that the less amount of education an individual has, the higher their chances of being unemployed

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