Analysis Of Slavery And Immigrants From Africa By Roger Daniels

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Chapter three of Slavery and Immigrants from Africa by Roger Daniels had insightful information. It explains how “slave trade was a great international crime”(53). It goes into detail explaining that slave trade involved the transportation of more than nine million slaves, but not all made it into the New World. Slavery existed in every North American colony, including Canada but it became mostly prominent in the southern states. Though this was the case Northern merchants profited from slavery also. It was interesting that the Southern cotton planters and northern cotton textile manufacturers had a relationship based on the on the labor of Africans, even after the outlaw of the slave trade. An issue that was brought up was whether to consider the African slaves as immigrants. Though people tended to believe it is not immigration, a fact that cannot be ignored is how slave trade was “one of the most significant contributions to the peopling of the colonies”(54). The slaves that were brought over also brought along their culture or “baggage” as stated in the text. …show more content…
The slaves in the Caribbean Islands often died and brought forth the argument that slavery in the United States was “better” than in the Islands. Slave owners primarily only cared about what was more profitable in both areas. Slavery was viewed as just a business to them. This was a very harsh statement to me because it is hard to understand how a human being, can see this type of treatment to another human being as acceptable. It states that slave owners had two theories on how to treat their slaves. The first was if it was more profitable to breed the slaves for sale, they would provide better care for the slaves, this was the thought process of the American Upper South. The other theory was, it was more beneficial to work the slaves to death and then buy more of them, this was the view of the West Indian

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