Slavery In Nazi Douglas's Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass

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The subjugation of other human beings is something that is not scarce in history. There are dozens upon dozens of examples of civilizations practicing slavery of some sort. Today, many see slavery as something of the distant past, but slavery existed in all but name in the world of Nazi Germany. The Nazi Totalitarian Regime can be seen as a continuation of the American slave regime in many ways, however their several distinct differences can be explained as the product of economic and political differences. While not the primary focus of the Nazi regime, both governments use their power over others to benefit themselves through unpaid labor. The north american slave regime heavily relied on the slaves as a source for much needed labor …show more content…
In this situation, labor was merely a beneficial byproduct of what the Nazis were doing to their prisoners. To accomplish this complete domination over an entire group of people, both regimes use a number of the same tactics. The dehumanization method of domination is used by both regimes to establish a high degree of control over those dominated. In his book, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass opens with the story of how his own birthday is a mystery to him as well as almost all other slaves. He states: “I do not remember to have ever met a slave who could tell of his birthday. [. . .] The White children could tell their ages. I could not tell why I ought to be deprived of the same privilege” (Douglass, 1). Any opportunity that arose for the objectification of the slave was taken by the slave owners. When treated as subhuman, the slave owners could make decisions without moral barriers being broken all in the name of wealth. In fact, Douglass goes into great detail with how slaves were valued in the eyes of their masters. At one point he as well as …show more content…
In North America, slaves are constantly separated from one another by being bought and sold freely. Douglass states: “Frequently, before the child has reached its twelfth month, its mother is taken from it, and hired out on some farm a considerable distance off” (Douglass, 1-2). This separation of mother from child deprives the child from a very essential relationship and removes all distraction of family. In the concentration camps it is common upon entry for the prisoners to be split into two groups. One group is sent immediately to be slaughtered while the other is given labor roles for a time before meeting the same fate. This selection process immediately breaks families apart, and crushes all hope for the surviving

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