Slavery In John M. Mcpherson's For Cause And Comrades?

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The Civil War was a war unlike many others that occurred throughout that span of the United State of America’s History. The war was fought between the citizens between the northern states and the southern states. Some call this war a war that pitted brother against brother. The fighting broke out among people that had common qualities, but different views when it came to political, social and economic issues. For instance, the debate on State’s rights or slavery was heavily debated prior and during the Civil War from the early to mid-1800. In the book, For Cause and Comrades by John M. McPherson, the stories of enlisted soldiers of the Union and Confederate Army are explained in detail. The book goes into detail on what influences drew men …show more content…
Religion is something that plays a large role in the actions and decisions of individuals. The enlistment of soldiers form both the Union and Confederate sides could not escape the role that religion would play on and off the battlefield during the world war. In the case of many, “soldiers who were deeply religious when they listed became more so on the battlefield” (64). This is true because putting your life on the line for your nation and citizens around you is one of the ultimate sacrifices that a human being can make. To be able to do so, it seems fit that soldiers on both sides of the war turned to some sort of god or higher power for faith and guidance. God not only gave them the faith for themselves to keep fighting, that God was also there to answer their questions, distract from the fear of war, and explain the horrific events and acts of violence they saw on a day to day basis. For example, McPherson tells the story of an eighteen year old Soldier of the …show more content…
The discussion and argument over issues such as state’s rights and the institution of slavery was a constant theme throughout the period of time leading up to the war, and while it took its course. Lincoln’s army was against the spread of slavery, and wanted to uphold the Union at any cost to either side. Jefferson Davis’ Confederate army claimed to fight for the power for a state to choose what would or would not occur within its boundaries, and in support of the institution of slavery. For a soldier to choose a side to fight on during the war served as indication to personal beliefs. A soldiers personal beliefs would have to align quite closely with the men whom fought alongside them. They would also have to be deeply imbedded into the hearts of many in order for the war to continue as long as it did. While engaged in warfare within the south, many unionist soldiers were reinforced in their ideologies that slavery was an unnecessary evil plaguing the United States. One Union soldier who explicitly notes himself as not being an abolitionist claims “The institution of slavery is as much a curse to the whites as the blacks and kills industry and improvements of every kind” (118). In other words, this means that there are no true benefits or claims that could support slavery. The Union Soldier saw slavery as

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