Slavery History Essay

2046 Words 9 Pages
Slavery is defined as bondage, held against someone’s will, severe toil or drudgery. Slavery began in America when the first African slaves were brought to Jamestown, Virginia in 1619. The slaves were to be sold to white farmers to assist in the production of crops such as tobacco. The African slaves lived on large farms or small plantations. The owners, “masters” of the slaves governed every aspect of the slave’s lives. The slaves were not allowed to be educated. Each and every movement of the slave was restricted and monitored. If a slave was rebellious to any given instruction, the slave was brutally punished physically. The women slaves were very often sexually abused by the owners. Slaves were divided by the owners by placement …show more content…
A scene takes place at the tin mill where a black man is accused of stealing a bucket of nails. The black man did not steal or have any part in stealing the nails, however the fear that he has of going to trial is more than he can bear. He does not believe that he would receive a fair trial. Neither the judge nor the jury would ever believe that a black man was innocent. This fear prompts the black man to commit suicide by jumping in the river and drowning …show more content…
Slave families were always vulnerable to abuse, threat and the reality of being separated from each other. This vulnerability continued after abolishment. While slaves were not recognized as being legally married while enslaved they did form families. These families did normal family things. In private they held the titles of mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, sons and daughters. These families taught their children trade and survival skills. The slave’s families emphasized values, provided shelter, love and companionship. They imposed discipline on their children. Family history was told and identities were given. The type of family structuring that the slaves had adapted was not enhanced by receiving freedom. Education did not improve on a major scale after abolishment. Schools that were initiated for African Americans experienced financial hardships while lacking support from the white Americans. Thus education for the African Americans continued for many as it was instructed while in bondage. Slaves implemented alternative paths to learning. Education became a communal effort. The lack of formal education promoted learning form parents, spouses, family members and other slaves. Slaves were often instructed by their owners. The slaves were encouraged to read the Bible due to the pressuring of Christians to the owners to allow Bible teaching. The

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