Benefits Of Coercion

1268 Words 6 Pages
Historians face one of the big dilemmas concerning American society that values freedom yet they could support slavery and other forms of coercion such as Indian Removal Act and the forced takeover of Mexican land. Slave owners and supporters believe that the powerful should be free to coerce the less powerful. Those who opposed slavery believed that enslaved people should be free of coercion. There are many reason American society would support slavery have become popular and a mainstream in America. Furthermore, the Northerners and the Southerner knew that slaves were essential for their society, and that land was needed for slavery expansion by acquiring more land using coercion. The growth of slavery lead to the rise of …show more content…
Although, slavery was not mentioned in the Constitution, but it was implied. The Constitution mentioned three specific clause: Slave Trade, ⅗ Clause, and Fugitive Slave Law. Most individuals were fearful that bigger states would have more power than them. In Virginia, people were worried about taxation without representation, since they were the most populated if free and enslaved people were counted. This clause was made simply for counting purposes and not for “humanness.” The ⅗ Clause assured overrepresentation of the slaves in the Congress and the Electoral College. As more Northern states were beginning to free their slaves. Southern slave owners were worried that enslaved African Americans will run North for freedom. The solution to their worries was the Fugitive Slave law of 1793 that required slaves to be returned to their owners like how property is returned. Yet slaves still escaped to the North through the “Underground Railroad” (Jones, 330). So, the federal government created the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, that required local and federal agents to retrieve the runaway slaves no matter where they were in the U.S. , thus there are no asylum for slaves (Jones, 330). For the Slave Trade, in exchange for giving Congress rights to regulate International shipping, convention allowed importation of slaves for twenty years. Therefore, slavery became …show more content…
In the late 1820s, many white people including the president, were calling for the removal of Cherokee in the Southeast. Then, in 1829, gold was discovered in Georgia hills which brought 10,000 miners to Cherokee territory (Jones, 277). This discovery made President Jackson see the Cherokee nation as an hindrance to Georgia’s economy. Jackson also resented the fact that Cherokee considered themselves to be a sovereign equal to the U.S. This shows that Jackson hated people like Cherokees that question his authority. So, he is in favor of removing all Indians from the South to grab more lands for the whites (Jones, 277). In 1830, the Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, which provided an exchange of lands with the Indians in any of the territories, and their removal from the west of the Mississippi (Jones, 277). The Cherokee nation refused to sign the removal treaties. Georgia lacked the authority to remove Indians from their lands, but that didn’t stop the president from sending troops to Georgia to force them off their homelands in 1832. The United States engaged on their promises to let the Cherokee nation to be responsible for their own affairs, and free of the dictate of individuals states like

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