Slavery And The Competition For Freedom In The American Civil War

1657 Words 7 Pages
Unity is the main factor that keeps a nation from falling apart, however, without the cohesion of a nation, war amongst one another will break out and the very foundation a country relies on will fall apart. The United States was unable to resolve the north and south’s dispute on whether or not slavery should be permitted in the nation which led to an all-out Civil War. The presence of slavery in the American economy separated the northern and southern states, and the competition for power in the government grew because both sides desired to manage slavery in the nation. After several acts, compromises, and acts of violence in the United States, the nation’s unity began to dissolve and war was the only way to settle the differences. There were …show more content…
Not only did Lovejoy’s reputation see a positive growth, but he also became the first white person to lose his life in the name of slavery, marking the beginning of the violence between pro-slavery supporters and abolitionists prior to the American Civil War. The motivation of Lovejoy’s murder was that he actively supported the end of slavery which clearly divides the north and the south in terms of views, and further reflects how mere disagreements on slavery can lead to intense violence. Abolitionists viewed slavery as an evil to society, while southerners developed the argument that slavery is a positive good because they take care of their slaves who would otherwise have a difficult time being free and trying to find a job. Lovejoy’s murder caused the abolitionist movement to expand in the north erupting in even more debate amongst citizens and in the government on the issue of slavery leading to even more bloodshed on American …show more content…
Tension between the abolitionists and pro-slavery supporters were already at a high, but the violence in Kansas led to growing fear and paranoia from both sides. With abolitionists like John Brown having the ability to cause chaos, southerners worried that all northerners were abolitionists, while northerners feared the “slave power conspiracy” where slave-owners held power in the government and planned to expand slavery. The events in Kansas also triggered Senator Charles Sumner to be beaten into a coma by a southerner, Preston Brooks, after Sumner spoke out on the occurrences in Kansas involving him publically shaming several pro-slavery supporters. By the mid-nineteenth century, Americans were publically displaying their dismay for abolitionists or slavery, depending on which side they were on, and the two sides failed to find ways to properly communicate about slavery without resorting to

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