Slavery And Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

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Slavery and Racism are important aspects in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. In the novel, Huck and Jim leave St. Petersburg and head out into the country, going on different adventures in many towns. The time period of when this novel, was when slavery was permitted and some slaves would risk their lives to try to gain freedom. Jim became an escaped slave and because of how Huck was influenced by society, made Huck believe Jim was less of a person than he is. But through the adventures the friendship of Huck and Jim gets stronger, there is a change in Huck’s way of treating Jim. Huck begins to question society’s belief of racism and slavery once he begins his journey with Jim. Mark Twain exposes Huck’s immaturity …show more content…
When the King and the Duke sell Jim back into slavery, Huck is angry at them for that. Soon he finds out where Jim is being held, and he starts to feel what he is doing is wrong, with helping Jim escape. So he starts to write a letter to Miss.Watson. The letter states where Jim is and how she can come and retrieve him. But Huck soon realizes how much Jim has impacted him and he could not seem to send the letter out. “But somehow I couldn’t seem to strike no places to harden me against him” Twain 367). This is a big leap from how Huck acted about Jim being black to now. Huck has rejected the racism that society has put on him, and is acting on his own beliefs. He finally sees Jim as a person and would risk his life to go save him from slavery, each was very different than the way he once was before the journey …show more content…
After saving Jim, they go to escape from the townspeople guarding the barn. While they were running to the river, Tom got shot in the leg by one of the townspeople. Once they got to the shore Tom was starting to tell Huck that he did not need a doctor but Huck and Jim knew he needed one. “I knowed he was white inside, and I reckoned he’d say what he did say-so it was all right, now, and I told Tom I was a-going for a doctor ” (Twain 475). This was a step back in Huck and Jim’s friendship. In the early chapters, Huck made a huge transformation from thinking Jim was property to now a person. But he is still influenced greatly by society, which made him compare Jim to a white man. Huck still believes that white men are superior over blacks, even though Huck thinks Jim is a person he still believes that he is not equal to him and other white

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