Changes In The Transatlantic Slave Trade

1942 Words 8 Pages
In the creation of the Transatlantic slave trade, there was a popular feeling from both sides over the untrustworthiness of their allies and/or the slaves traded due to the dress, language, manner, etc. that the other presented as well as their pigment of skin. Throughout the slave trade, there was a need for co-operation to maintain the trade, to keep up with the rising demand from European colonies that needed labor for plantations. The slave trade depended entirely upon the relationship between African leaders to the Charter companies and private traders to achieve the numbers for the high demand for slaves that Europe called for. These demands pressed upon local African power systems to provide the numbers needed for slaves that served …show more content…
In the 15th century, there was the introduction of the slave trade with the Portuguese and Spanish beginning to use the trade in their colonies. It was during this time that Portugal, and later other countries, were able to expand their trade overseas and found Africa. Initially slaves came from state organized raids and warfare, but as trade progressed for African communities, the insecurity caused by these modes of production caused Africans to turn on one another and sell their friends and neighbors into slavery. As well as this, Portuguese traders would also kidnap people from the west coast of Africa to enslave, making the area more insecure while the traders also begun trading alliances with more coastal communities for slaves. This trade opened up the Atlantic to Europe during the Age of Renaissance. Up until this point, only the Mediterranean was open for trade routes. This was a positive change for Africans as well, allowing more variety in trade as well as the introduction of new items of value and for warfare. The introduction of West Africa to immigration for slavery was another effect of the slave trade, resulting in over 9.5 million Africans being immigrated to the New World. Even before the introduction of Europeans to Africa, slavery in a form, still existed for …show more content…
Due to the naval and imperial power of Britain, they were able to influence other states to the idea of abolishing the slave trade universally. Christian assumptions about the inherent unity of the human race as well as the Christian need to convert Africans to Christianity played a large role in influencing British opinions by this period. The trade continued however, well into the nineteenth-century, even if the idea of slavery was abolished. British participation in the trade continued, both legally and illegally. Their participation continued through the purchase of slaves for British colonies, the provision of goods, credit, insurance, and ships to foreign slave traders as well as more direct roles in the slave trade. Demand kept this trade alive during this century, such as within Brazil until 1850 and Cuba until 1867. The profits from plantation economies such as these led to the continued need for slaves. In the end, it took many years for the popular trade to be abolished and properly stopped in all European countries, as well as colonies such as the Americas. Even after the end of the slave trade, slaves continued to be used, especially in the United

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