Causes Of Slave Resistance George Washington Carver

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The majority of students, including myself knows about slavery. Our own selves have seen, heard, and often talked around it intensively in class discussions or with our parents. The biggest common slaves that were famous by doing something drastic was Harriet Tubman, Fredrick Douglas, and George Washington Carver. Harriet Tubman became famous for her secretive underground railroad that led an enormous amount of slaves to freedom by following the North Star. Fredrick Douglas became famous for being able to read and write an intelligent book about his life. George Washington Carver became famous for peanut butter. What they all have in common could be found in their rebellion or shown that they knew more than what they masters’ thought they …show more content…
He effectively gives numerous accounts of evidence proving slaves showing resistance to their masters. First, slave resistance during the Middle Passage showed how fed up and tired they were of their masters and how the impetuous treatment they received from them. During the 1720s the slave resistance was prevalent and frequently a part of the life on a number of British and American slave ships. The slaves often showed that they were protesting by wanting to starve themselves to death or to overthrow the ship and manage to navigate it back to their homeland. In addition to slave resistance is variable throughout the 1720s, the Negro Slave Revolts in America was a study conducted by Hebert Aptheker and he identified two concise classifications of slave resistance: subtle resistance and band resistance. Subtle resistance could be characterized by how the slave resistance was more of a personal battle between them and their master. One of the ways the slaves would show resistance is by simply refusing to eat or getting more intense by throwing themselves overboard, and even unbearably committing suicide. As of now many captains have had to face these events and after a while of letting this happen, many of the captains of the ships started to force feed the …show more content…
For example, in 1721 eight of the slaves on the Henry of London ship figured out a way to free themselves from the iron chains and sought out to subdue the ship and the fifty crewmen. After the crewmen fought back as much as they could with cutlaces and firearms the mutineers ended up jumping overboard to escape. Since the slaves are starting to fight back and become more and more resistant to their masters, frequently the captains and their crewmen started to treat their slaves in a disturbing inhumane way and considering the slaves felt as if they had to resist already, the treatment they received from their masters cause even more accounts of uprisings. Also, many of students, teachers, parents, etc. know about the Amistad slave mutiny that happened on June 30, 1839. This slave mutiny consisted of a slave leader named Joseph Cinque in which he killed the captain and the cook, then he goes on to order the surviving crew members in which their names were Jose Ruiz and Pedro Montez to maneuver the ship back to Africa. However, during the night hours Ruiz and Montez headed for the United States. A captain in Washington, D.C, member of the naval vessel, named Thomas R. Gedney cut off the Amistad and brought the slaves to trial after finding out what was going on. Fifty-two of the slaves aboard were known to be not ladinos, which means slaves

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