Slave Culture In The Caribbean Diaspora

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Register to read the introduction… This paved a way towards the creation of new land and enterprises which in return increased the production of materials such as sugar and coffee beans. Although, slaves were forced into a controlled environment and labor, their native language and culture was still close to their hearts. As Thornton writes, “Whatever the brutalities of the Middle passage or slave life, it was not going to cause the African-born to forget their mother language or change their ideas about beauty in design or music: nor would it cause them to abandon the ideological underpinnings of religion or ethics – not on arrival in America, not ever in their lives.” With this mother language, culture and religion not forgotten, slaves developed a way of communicating amongst each other and also grasped the “American way” when speaking to their masters (Thornton:317-320). Also, by keeping the memories and traditional ways of their people, Africans were able to pass their knowledge and history of their people down to the next generation which would eventually bring to life the monstrosities that really occurred during this time …show more content…
In order to put a carnival band together, it takes many weeks of welding, sewing, gluing, applying feathers, sequins, foil papers, glitter and lots of creativity, energy, and patience. With individual experience, it takes a lot of time and effort in order to make what you envisioned comes to life. Costumes are sewn, decorated, and fitted to each individual dancer. All this creative activity takes place in what are referred to in the Caribbean as “mas camps,” where teamwork and organization are crucial to creating an award-winning …show more content…
These Africans were brought to the Caribbean as indentured laborers upon the abolition of the slave trade in 1807. Many of them were of Yoruba decent who could actually recall the enslavement of their ancestors whither it be from Nigeria or even through wars which were being fought in Africa. With the liberation of their people, they were able to rise in numbers and create a society in Trinidad and Tobago of their own culture and practices of their religious beliefs (Lewis). Throughout Trinidad and Tobago today, the prominent religion is Catholicism, however for the Yoruba people their main religion was based upon the Muslim faith. They believed in a religious phenomenon of “Shango”, the worship of orisha or deities, which is an Afro-Caribbean religion in Trinidad amalgamating in the worship of several Yoruba

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