Slaughterhouse Five Critical Essay

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3. Introduction to the Slaughterhouse-Five

The ways we deal with our everyday life are different, some of us choose to deal with our problems and fight for the things which we want to achieve, but sometimes the reality in which we find ourselves is extremely cruel, perhaps each of us would have chosen to leave this reality through imagination. Fleeing from the cruel reality of war and the invention of a fictional planet is more or less the situation in which the main character of Slaughterhouse-Five by the American author Kurt Vonnegut, finds himself. Slaughterhouse-Five as a literary novel combines in itself historical, sociological, psychological and scientific elements.

In order to finish his long thoughtful project Vonnegut had to find
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Through new narrative techniques Vonnegut blurs the distance between him and the main character, between fact and fiction and thus eases the otherwise jarring transitions between fantastical escapism and horrifying …show more content…
First of all Vonnegut finished writing Slaughterhouse-Five, during a period of time when science was overwhelming religion and as the answer to life questions. The second fact worth considering is that during that time U.S. was one of the most powerful nations on earth. Regardless of that Pilgrim creates his own mythical place where time has the answers to life questions. With this solution, myth has become his focus of understanding the great questions of ‘why’. Vonnegut doesn’t find peace in religion but chooses to create a fictional planet to escape from bitter reality of war and seek support and understanding of life in a fabulous place in which time and extraterrestrials have all the answers to

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