Slang And African American English

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Sonia Sanchez wrote in her collections of poems It’s A New Day, “We gon be some beautiful/ black/ women gon move like the queens we gon be full”(Sanchez,17). Like this example, Sanchez often writes in African American English. African American English (AAE) is commonly referred to as Ebonics, as well as black speech, black vernacular, and several other phrases. According to William Labov, “This African American Vernacular English shares most of its grammar and vocabulary with other dialects of English. But it is distinct in many ways, and it is more different from Standard English (SE) than any other dialect spoken in continental North America.” (Pullum, 39). African American English is in fact a form of Standard English (SE), and can be considered …show more content…
Pullum states that many standard English speakers interpret the dialect as “just a badly spoken version of their language, marred by a lot of ignorant mistakes in grammar and pronunciation, or more than that, an unimportant and most abusively repertoire of street slang used by an ignorant urban class.” (Pullum, 40). Slang is an expression consisting of words or phrases that do not embody a grammatical pattern and has not yet been adopted fully into the language of its speakers. In contrast, African American English is a syntactic dialect that possesses concrete grammatical rules and spoken within the African American culture (Pullum, …show more content…
Although this is a strict matter of ethics among Speech Pathologists, it is unfornutate that the same position is not expected across American education systems. It is essential that educators are knowledgeable on the subject of African American English in order to allow their students of African American descent to be able to learn in an environment where their speech is positively perceived. It is also important that beyond the classroom and in the work setting particularly, Americans begin to accept AAE as a dialect and not discriminate against those who primarily speak

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