Skyscrapers Essay

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Chicago, late 1880s, the industrializing city is struck by a zap of a unique metropolistic architecture created by architects that turned the tables in American culture and nationalism. The birth of skyscrapers was the one of the early embers created by this zap that eventually led to the spark of change throughout the country in the following century. These embers turned into large architectural flickers that generated cultural and nationalistic upbringings like the Chicago World’s fair. Eventually those large flickers became flames made by the architects of the upbringings that lit up inspiration within early twentieth century architects who established new trends and fundamentals in architecture that flourished all over the country. Throughout …show more content…
While architect Louis Sullivan was considered the founder of “modern high rise American architecture” like skyscrapers (Karwatka), William Jenney was the first architect to design and build a skyscraper in the United States, which was built in 1884. Although Jenney’s skyscraper gained popularity, Sullivan’s skyscrapers gained more recognition due to the fact that his buildings were designed along his belief of how the “design of a building should acknowledge the structural shape underneath” (Karwatka). Sullivan used his belief to emphasize the supporting structures of his first skyscraper, Chicago’s Auditorium Building, that were made of iron and steel by emphasizing on the height of the building to draw the eyes upward with the exterior design of the building would allude to vertical lines. This concept of emphasis on form was proven successful as this skyscraper had ultimately given his a distinct reputation in the architectural world along with his personal concept that would spread throughout Chicago architecture. Sullivan and his concept were significant in American cultural change through the fact that he had been an influence of another distinct architect, which was Frank Lloyd Wright. His concept was popularized by later modern - day design teachers by having it shared with design students all over the country, stating it as “form follows …show more content…
One of those architects was Frank Lloyd Wright, who had ironically trained under the supervision of Sullivan; Wright introduced a new style of architecture to as a goal to create new “organic” architecture, which made a long impact in American culture. Wright removed all European influence from his buildings and incorporated environmental aspect of his buildings’ locations into his designs. His designing technique led to the creation of prairie style architecture. Most of his prairie style designs included “characteristically horizontal houses with open plans and flowing space” (Lewis). His prairie style housing gained popularity when they were introduced, and are still seen in present day America and is not often seen outside of the United States, showing that Wright Prairie style designs contributed to making America more culturally unique since it did not allow the influence of any European

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