Analysis Of Bronfenbrenner´s Skin Hunger

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In the excerpt Skin Hunger, the story of a little 4 year old girl named Laura is told. Laura is in the hospital, and at 4 years old weighs only 26 pounds. Connected to a feeding tube, Laura is also being fed a high calorie diet, in an effort to put weight on her tiny little body. Her medical team is essentially at a loss of why she is not gaining weight, and diagnoses her with infantile anorexia. As the story unfolds and the reader is clued in to not only Laura’s life, but also her Mother, Virginia’s, it becomes evident that there is certainly more going on than what appears. Most people understand how important human interaction is for a newborn, and even if they don’t, they are just naturally drawn to want to care for and provide affection …show more content…
In his 4 part description of how environment and biology work together, the first one is describes the microsystem. For the infant, its microsystem is typically its family; whether that is mother or father (Sigelman & Rider, 2015). This microsystem should provide the infant with intimate interaction that establishes a connection to their environment (Sigelman & Rider, 2015). In his 3rd part of his theory, Bronfenbrenner discusses the impact of the exosystem, or the environment outside the child’s world. Equally, its effects on the parent’s world have a direct impact on the child’s world also (Sigelman & Rider, 2015). The child is essentially affected by what is happening to the parent. In the case with Laura, she has been affected by her mom’s upbringing and influences. Virginia’s inability to be physically connected to Laura stemmed from her lack of love and affection as a small …show more content…
I will do my best to assess the whole situation of the child, including how they are being raised and what type of environment they are living in. I will take the time to get to know the child, and respect his or hers needs. A young child will not have the vocabulary to express what he or she is feeling. Getting to the root of the problem will take patience and understanding. It is also important to acquire information about the parents or family, and what their environment was like as a child. There is usually more to the story that meets the eye, and it is important to gather as much information as possible. When I was younger I did not fully appreciate the influence that family and environment could have on a person. Now that I am older I see the importance of genes and environment, and how they work in unison to form the complex humans that we develop into. Laura and Justin’s stories were different from each other’s, however the parallel between them validates the importance of human interaction at a young age. Not to mention the influence that we as adults can have in making an impact in another humans life. In reading this story I found myself particularly inspired by Mama P. She was willing to take the time with a child, and provide the nurture and attention they

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