Sissela Bok's Lying: Moral Choice In Public And Private Life?

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In Sissela Bok’s Lying: Moral Choice in Public and Private Life, the author gives and approach to philosophic questions that regard ethical issues, thus making this book favorable to a high degree. Bok considers lying from the perspective of utilitarian philosophers. These philosophers confirm acts more according to the graciousness and malice of their consequences. The topic of both chapters concern lying and whether one should lie or speak honestly depending on the situation. Additionally, it goes further into detail about why people lie, how they rationalize and whether or not the justifications are deemed appropriate. Bok bases her work on whether one should lie or speak honestly and what one should say exactly as well as what should …show more content…
This happens quite often as anyone that is lied to can experience various negative emotion including a lack of trust. Lies also yield longitudinal effects as one may feel that it is difficult to have trust in another individual. The deceived tend to look back at past beliefs and actions when encountered with lies. They are unable to make informed decisions according to the most adequate information available. In the matter of deception, it is the loss of choice that hinders the deceived. One only wishes to be lied to only if it serves some sort of benefit as we may wish to be lied to but prefer to choose when that would happen. Such alternatives should be chosen and not “imposed by lies or other forms of manipulation.” “The perspective of the deceived is shared by all those who feel the consequences of a lie, whether or not they are themselves lied to” (21). Regardless of who is deceived, everyone experiences similar ramifications after being lied to, and when one wish to lie, there should be no negative ulterior motives. Skepticism denies the possibility of knowledge as determinism denies the possibility of freedom, yet both knowledge and freedom are required to act in making a rational choice (21). Being questionable about something prevents one from accepting new ideas; …show more content…
“A liar must trust they can make wise use of the power lies bring. They are confident in their ability to distinguish the times when good reasons support their decision to lie. They would prefer a ‘free-rider status, giving them the benefits of lying without the risks of being lied to” (23). When liars organize their lies in advance, they tend to feel certain in their capability to swindle others. They prefer to lie without being lied to. “It is crucial to see the distinction between the freeloading liar and the liar whose deception is a strategy for survival in a corrupt society” (23). Freeloading liars are rather selfish and only wish to lie for their personal gains, but some other liars may be in a situation where their hands are tied where the best option is to lie whereas telling the truth can do harm. The outlook of the liar tends to disregard harm to themselves and harm to society. A liar breaks his integrity, credibility and respect for his word are both damaged. White lies probably do not harm the liar in the same way that a public lie about an important matter. “The sheer energy the liar has to devote to shoring them up is the energy that honest people can dispose of freely” (25). As liars continue to deceive others, it requires time and thought to cover up previously lies with even more lies; however, the deceived could care less about these efforts from the

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