Sir Clifford Sifton's Open Door Policy

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History Essay Throughout the wars many events involving immigration shaped Canadians and their views resulting in a more accepting and interracial country. Before the war from the years of 1890 into WW1, Canada saw itself as a home to a white European population based on Anglican beliefs, those without the same mind set or beliefs were seen as enemy aliens resulting in distrust. The discrimination and distrust Canadians put upon the ones unlike them such as Blacks, Asians, Italians, Arabs, Greeks and Jews led to Sir Clifford Sifton’s idea of the “Open Door Policy”. This was a tactic to come across as welcoming to immigrants in need of a new home, but close the door on them if they did not meet our racial standards. As the twentieth century …show more content…
At the time, Canadians were blinded by the idea of enemy aliens causing them to discriminate anyone who was unlike them (mapleleafweb). The “Open Door Policy” was a tactic used to decrease the rapid speed and rate of non-Anglican ethic groups immigrating into Canada while still coming across as a welcoming nation with the belief that “the more immigrants allowed to come to Canada, the better it would be” (Traces Of Discrimination In Canadian immigration policy Before 1960, Pimpao). At the time, Canada was seen as a land of new opportunities with our vast farm land and safe environment, appealing to many ethnic immigrants such as the Blacks, Italians, Asians, Arabs, Greeks and Jews. This approach was the idea of Canada’s immigration minister, Sir. Clifford Sifton, who had advertised free farm land in European newspapers in hope to attract sturdy, hard-working farmers from northern and eastern Europe who would fit into our society without a second glance. “The more we get the better” said a minister referring to British immigrants. They could come with a single shilling and still be welcomed with open arms if deemed fit (Jean 81). This proved that even the poorest British man would be picked over a rich ethnic man as long as he proved fit. Another …show more content…
Although they were not fully sold on the idea, it was a step for Canada on the path to a more interracial population. Before the war Canada would mainly target white nations but once the living conditions in Europe and Britain became to excel, less and less were motivated to immigrate to Canada causing minimal growth in our population along with a booming economy demanding jobs be filled. “Government launched massive advertising in Britain, United states, and Europe in hope to interest potential white Anglican immigrants to fill in positions in need such as farmers in the west” (Spotlight Canada, 23). If Canada were to continue to rely on the immigration patterns from these countries, Canada would lack in population and an interracial future. In the beginning of the twentieth century things began to change as a flood of immigrants migrated to Canada. These ethnic groups were faced with resentment and isolation in the early years due to their difference of race or belief. “Canadians believed in Anglo-conformity, meaning changing immigrants religion to make them blend in, causing the Canadians to feel more at ease” (Spotlight Canada,

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