Simon Bolivar Essay

1113 Words Jan 31st, 2014 5 Pages
SIMON BOLIVAR
ONE COUNTRY, ONE BROKEN DREAM.
Herbert Maduro
Columbia Southern University

SIMON BOLIVAR
ONE COUNTRY, ONE BROKEN DREAM.
Herbert Maduro
Columbia Southern University

Simon Bolivar has been considered by many historians as the liberator of the Americas, he lead an army that liberated Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia from the Spanish rule. Bolivar dreamed in having these countries unified as one big country called “The Gran Colombia”. These countries would have shared a centralized government and would have had the city of Bogota as its capital.
In this article I want to explore the reasons why he could not achieve this dream of unifying these countries and if he had what economic and social
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Bolivar was named president of the Gran Colombia and Santander one of his closest generals was named the vice-president. At the start it was only part of Panama, Venezuela and Colombia, but as Bolivar battled the Spaniards with success other countries were added which were Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia.
Bolivar was a leader of man and armies, but often times the generals that were close to him either supported him or was against him in a passive way. He was seeing as conceded, egomaniac, and probably did not make a first good impression. As Jose De San Martin perception of their meeting in Guayaquil “San Martin's reception by Bolivar in Guayaquil was not auspicious. The port city, belonging to the viceroyalty of Peru, had been hastily seized by the Liberator, who pointedly welcomed San Martin to "Colombian soil." Also in a banquet the following observation was made “The two generals had three conferences, all brief, with no witnesses. Reports and memoranda gave differing versions of the discussions--and even today what occurred is still disputed. Certainly their differences were displayed at a banquet Bolivar hosted for his guest on his final night in Guayaquil. To the Liberator's toast of himself and San Martin as "the two greatest men of South America," the Argentine

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