Similarities Between The Scarlet Letter And The Minister's Black Veil

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Register to read the introduction… As well as similar theme, the characterizations of the stories are the same. The minister in the short story, Mr. Hooper, represents his sin by placing a black veil over his face while the main character in the Scarlett Letter, Hester Prynne, wears an “A” on her clothing. Although both of the symbols represent sin, the characters have different reasons for wearing them. Another parallel between the two stories is the community surrounding these characters, both puritan and conservative societies who frown upon the exploitation of their sins. The characters are ostracized as a result. The similarities between Hawthorne’s two pieces expose his unique style and the recurring theme of representation of …show more content…
Hooper became the gossip of everyone in town, even among the children walking to school (Page 1044). His wife was even affected by the town’s rumors, so much so that she insisted on leaving him if he didn't show her what he was hiding behind the veil. “Mr. Hooper smiled to think that only a material emblem had separated him from happiness (Page 1046).” Hawthorne is indicating that, in fact, Mr. Hooper is acting as a lesson for the people of his town. When the narrator says, “By the aid of his mysterious emblem – for there was no other apparent cause – he became a man of awful power over souls that were in agony for sin (1047).” He also implies that the people are discomforted because Mr. Hooper is a reminder of sins they have committed and are ashamed of. The minister continued with his sermons and masses the same he always did, but because he is wearing a symbol of sin, he is no longer the same. The implication that he has sinned is enough for people to turn their back on him. The parallel seen in “The Scarlett Letter” is almost identical. Hester Prynne becomes the topic of the towns gossip because of the A she is wearing on her chest. Through reading “ The Minister’s Black Veil” and using my knowledge of “The Scarlet Letter”, I noticed Nathaniel Hawthorne’s unique style of portraying sins and his recurring themes. Even though the characters in the story, Hester Prynne and Mr. Hooper, have different reason for displaying their sins, the

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