Similarities Between Odysseus And Argos

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Greek mythology offers insight into human behavior and life lessons, such as the one in … In the tale of The Odyssey the characters, Argos and Odysseus are telling the story of a dog and his master. It also tells the vulnerability of a young animal without supervision of its owner. Much to Odysseus’ surprise, he left Argos without thinking what would happen to him in his absence. The unfortunate life that Argos lived without the presence of Odysseus was almost unbearable. Argos being deprived of basic needs, his life lacked peace, love, and harmony. Meanwhile, Odysseus was fighting in a war, and while Argos was going through this treachery. Twenty years later, Odysseus finally returned home in search for his long lost, dog to find him in …show more content…
Reunited at last, after one look into his master’s eyes he was filled with peace and new he was finally home. The ghost of death was upon Argos. You can’t always assume that after leaving something so young, their life will still be pleasant. The loss is immeasurable and Argos’ death was inevitable. In the painting “Argos Recognizes Odysseus” by Theodoor van Thulden and the poem Argos by Alexander Pope, they both use greek myths to portray that leaving something so precious and young the effects of the world leave life long scars that never fade, only deepen. In the poem “Argos” by Alexander Pope, the author uses the main character of the poem, Argos, from an original story called “The Odyssey.” In the story The Odyssey, Odysseus, the main character, goes off to this place called Troy to fight in a war …show more content…
His “Essay on Criticism” was published anonymously in 1711, and was furiously attacked in print by John Dennis, a famous literacy critic of the day whom Pope had satirized in the poem. Dennis then retaliated by referring to Pope as a “humped-back toad.” In 1714 he published a more complex version of The Rape of the Lock. Between 1715 and 1720, he, William Broome, and Elijah Fenton wrote his verse translation of Homer’s Iliad (his translation of the Odyssey) and which, published at intervals over the years, in six volumes. 1717 saw the publication of Pope’s “Winsdor Forrest,” poem celebrating the Treaty of Utrecht. That same year his father died. Later in 1725 he published his edition of Shakespeare’s Works, and the first three volumes of his translation of the Odyssey. Then in 1726 the last three volumes of the Odyssey were published too. (“Alexander Pope: A Brief Biography David Cody npg.) Pope was known as ‘the Wasp of Twickenham’ because of his stinging satirical attacks on famous people, especially other writers. Samuel Johnson claimed that Alexander Pope cured headaches by inhaling the steam of coffee, which Pope referred to as ‘Mocha’s happy tree.’ Pope has given us a number of famous phrases for example: ‘fools rush in where angels fear to trend’ in Pope’s “An Essay on Criticism.” In some of his poetry, three of his

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