Similarities Between Minoan And Mycenaean Civilizations

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Throughout the Bronze Age, the cultures of the Aegean civilizations showed influences in trade, religion and economic administration. The iconography of these civilizations not only revealed their culture but also how they functioned throughout Greece. Weapons and animal representations like bulls and griffins, are all characteristic of Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. But the settings in which they are presented offer deeper implications into their values and identity. Excavated frescos, pottery, and seals display these settings. Minoan iconography emphasizes communal ritual functions, shown through scenes of ritual practice and divinities in their art and material culture. However, Mycenaean design expresses boldness and achievement, often …show more content…
Mycenaeans utilized many of these icons for a kind of necrotrophic consumption in burials and in their art. But even though Minoan symbols were used, they were not necessarily used in Minoan context.
Animal representations are a common theme for both Minoan and Mycenaean, and the bull is no exception. However, evidence retrieved from Minoan Crete, shows that the bull was often used in ritual practices or as an instrument for offerings. Minoans characterized the bull as a symbol of strength, fertility, and protection. Ultimately seeing it as an association with the sun. Mycenaean culture adopted bull iconography as well, but many of the frescos and pottery display images of mythological griffins and chariots. The Greek mythology griffins are majestic, possessing an eagle sight, wings, and the strength of a lion’s hind legs. These aspects are from Minoan art, but best complemented the militaristic behavior and strength of Mycenaean civilization. Thus, early Mycenaean culture followed Minoan animalistic culture, but eventually developed it into their own image by adopting the animals of power. There’s also a Bull sport theme. Two leapers somersaulting the bull in a flying gallop are unusual, but the bull sports theme is seen on several seals from the mainland and finally become the subject of frescoes at Pylos and Tiryns. This is the most Minoan and
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The Lions Gate is a main entrance leading into Mycenae. It’s surrounded by walls made of massive stones from cyclopean masonry, but the most captivating is the structure perched above formed by a building system called corbelling. Two lions are in a heraldic pose, standing on two alters split by a column. The design of the column and use of alters are reminiscent of Minoan culture. Furthermore, since the column rest above the alter, it gives a sense of divinity possibly implying a deity. This monument incorporates Minoan iconography and features a Mycenaean perspective. The lions signify the ability of powerful animals to ward off evil or terrify enemies. But these lions are unlike other animals in that they are standing upright and in some ways becoming human-like. In addition to this, the alters and column design are Minoan while ultimately the design resembles the gold Minoan signet ring, “Asherah, Part III: The Lion Lady” (Minoan Goddess). The seal shows a capped female holding a staff, who’s flanked by two lions. The seal also features a saluting male and a shrine. The female is presented to possibly be a divinity object that the lions maybe honoring or contributing to her divine nature, but its feasible that Mycenaeans utilized this, to interpret an image that best fitted their citadel, one of strength and authority. It is

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