Similarities And Similarities Between Ancient Greece And Rome

810 Words 4 Pages
As Rome and Greece were set in prolific time periods, they were powerful and cultured nations. While the similarities between Greece and Rome are numerous, there are a differences that have decisively occurred. Their government, religion, philosophy, sculpture, literature, architecture, and women’s influence were essential to the whole of their society and humanities. Government is critical in every society to bring order, stability, and progress. In Rome, the community was governed by patricians and plebeians. Patricians, which is Latin for fathers, controlled the senate. Also, the Romans had praetors (judges), unlike the Greeks, as well as the privilege to vote. Obviously, Rome was a democracy. Although in Greece, the government was …show more content…
As Rome continued to conquer increasing territory, they adopted and modified their captors ways. In this case, the Romans took the Greek gods and goddess and changed the names. Like in Greece, Roman religion was public. The pontiffs (priests) in Rome preformed religious rituals to make the gods do what they desired, such as: ensure victory in war, safe childbirths, and bountiful harvests. Also, the Greeks attempted to escape fate, by resorting to mystery cults. These mystery cults originated from the chthonian deities that lived underground and were worshiped in secret by peasants. Despite religion being at the center of a community, many averted wholly or partially …show more content…
The Greeks tended to be more idealistic and realistic than the Romans, as they were propagandistic for the use of imperial power. Although the Romans turned to the idealism of Hellenic Greece under the reign of Augustus. His regime was short however. Nudity was a normality with Greek and Roman sculptures, however the Greek sculptures did not sculpt the women nude. Understandably, sculpture was used to influence the public and to be enjoyed by the masses. Literature in Greece was hallmarked by epic poetry, created by Homer, and lyrical poetry, verses sung to the lyre. A plebeian, Plautus began Rome’s age of comic theatre with his 130 plays. He molded after Meander and other Hellenistic new comedy playwrights using stock characters. New comedy was used in Greece to gratify the audience, avoiding political criticism and coarseness. Tragedy was used in both Greek and Roman theatre. Ultimately, literature was used to teach and satisfy the

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