Similarities And Differences Between Huckleberry Finm And To Kill A Mockingbird

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Even though written decades apart, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and To Kill a Mockingbird are very similar in their treatment of racism, social injustice, and the main character’s moral development. The two child narrators, Huckleberry Finn and Scout Finch, are very similar in their personalities and stories of self-discovery. They are both boyish and independent. They are both faced with moral decisions at a young age. Huck grows to realize the immorality of slavery and racism in pre-Civil War America ("Huck Finn Controversy") while Scout witnesses the double standard of separate-but-equal in the Jim Crow South. Though their communities think otherwise, they both come to the conclusion that everyone should be treated equally. They …show more content…
Atticus is a model of high standards and morals. He shows this by ignoring the racial prejudices around him in his pursuit of justice and equality for all, even a black man. (“To Kill a Mockingbird: Race, Class and Innocence in the Contemporary Society INTRODUCTION.") Through his example of great character, Scout learns and inherits these same beliefs. Huck comes to the understanding of the concepts of equality and humanity without instruction, but through the caring, selfless, fatherly example of Jim. ("Racial and Religious Hypocrisy in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.") Huck struggles with his revelation. “It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger, but I done it, and I warn’t ever sorry for it afterwards neither.” (Twain Chapter 15 Page 4) Huck was taught to hate “niggers”, but he slowly learns to love …show more content…
Atticus is an excellent father which he displays through genuine words and actions. He believes in equality with his children - he lets them refer to him by his first name – and in his children – he buys an air rifle for them both. Atticus speaks to them like they are adults, for example explaining to Scout that rape is "carnal knowledge of a female by force and without consent.” He never talks down to Scout and challenges her to speak in an articulate manner. ("Scouting for a Tomboy: Gender-Bending Behaviors in Harper Lee 's To Kill A Mockingbird") Atticus never emphasizes his authority over Scout. Atticus works to equip Scout with strong morals such as views on equality, but all while letting her think for

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