The Silk Road In Ancient China

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Without a doubt the most impactful geographical factor of ancient China is the development of the Silk Road. The Silk Road was a trade route opened during the Han Dynasty after a soldier traveled along the road for the purpose of breeding Chinese army’s horses with the horses of the Duyuan, who were descendants of Alexander the Great. When the soldier reported back to the emperor about the other civilizations he had come across in his travels and speculation about what else could be gained from trading with the west, the Silk Road was opened for western trade. (Mark, 2014) The Silk Road stretched from China through India, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Africa, Greece, Rome and Britain. Although many different goods were traded along the Silk …show more content…
The wall spread about 3,700 miles and was created by millions of forced laborers, many of whom were starved to death during its construction. Local kings and rulers built pieces of the wall and Qin linked together all of the smaller pieces, creating one solid wall. The idea of the wall came about to keep northern invaders from attacking China, however, it was ineffective as China was attacked several times over the next 1,000 years. (Acrobatiq, 2017) An additional cultural invention in China was the invention of paper by a Eunich named Tsai Lun. Paper was made by taking the bark from a mulberry plant with fibers of other plants and chopping and boiling them until a thick liquid was created. Once the liquid dried it could be peeled apart in sheets. Paper was much more thin and flexible than previously used papyrus which made its creation as well as distribution much easier. Books became more accessible to the Chinese which improved their educational system. The first dictionary was published on paper in 100 BCE. (Acrobatiq, …show more content…
Zoroastrianism was founded by the prophet Zoroaster around the 11th century BCE and was first preached to Indo-European speaking people. It was believed that the prophet received direct revelations from the supreme god, Ahura Mazda, “The Wise Lord”. Ahura Mazda’s code of purification and religious observance included the importance of honesty and being the good in the world and avoiding lies. He viewed the world in dualistic ways meaning the world struggled with the path of good or evil. The mantra of the religion was “good thoughts, good words, and good deeds”. Zoroastrianism shared the same general ideas of Christianity such as the views of the afterlife. When a good person died they were said to go to the Abode of Song, and a bad person would spend their afterlife in the Abode of Wickedness with wretched food and torture. (Acrobatiq,

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