King James I: The Glorious Revolution

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Essay #6 The glorious revolution began with the accession to the throne by James II, after the death of his brother, Charles II, in February 1685. This was possible due to the Tories having power in parliament, who were pro-Great Chain of being which allowed for James to get his ‘inheritance’. Although, once James sat upon the throne rebellion broke out led by Charles II favorite male bastard, Duke of Monmouth. The rebellion was put down fast since James had armed troops and the Duke had pitchforks. The Duke along with three hundred other rebels were sent to their deaths by the “Hanging Judge” Jefferys, which was a 15-minute trial and then hanged. The rest, eight hundred, were ‘transported’ to the American colonies. It was called the “Bloody …show more content…
In the 1st area of tension, sovereignty, they wanted the Duke of Monmouth to become the next king, wanted parliament to have more control, and the king to have limitation of rights and power they possessed. The 2nd area of tension, Finance, they were anti-court and the extravagance of it that was present during the reigns of James I and Charles II, who would have the last scandalous court, and wanted to limit spending by the crown. The 3rd area of tension, Religion, they took a strong stance against Catholics and wanted the emancipation of dissenters, Quakers. Puritans, and other religions who wanted the death of Charles I. The 4th area of tension, Foreign Policy, was related to their view towards religion in which they were pro-Dutch, who were protestants, and anti-French, who were devout Catholics. In the 5th area of tension, Local Control, they were said to represent the English people in the country and landowners and had their best interest in mind. The Whig party was very nationalistic and patriotic that hated Catholics with a …show more content…
The 5 tensions that came from the Tudor reign, problems of sovereignty, Law and Council; problem of Government Finance and Economy; problem of War and Foreign Policy; problem of Religion; and the problem of Local Control. For the problem of sovereignty, James and parliament did not see eye to eye due to him publishing a book, The True Law of Free Monarchies, 2 times, first in Scotland in 1598 then again in England. His book described the divine rights kings had, his ideals, personality, and lack of knowledge of parliament and its procedures were the reasons why they didn’t get along. Also, James only had 3 privy council members in the Commons meaning that he could not lean the parliament in his favor. Government Finance, although Elizabeth tried to be cut expenses and be frugal there was still corruption and insufficient money in the treasury. There was inflation and plague, court officials took bribes, greedy court, had a big family which was expensive, royal debt of 365,000 pounds, he also spent a lot on gifts, wardrobe, palaces raising the debt to 900,000 pounds by 1918 over double the debt at the beginning of his reign. Foreign Policy, James was an arbiter of peace, marring off his son, Henry, to a catholic Spanish princess and his daughter, Mary, to protestant Frederick V. But in 1612 Henry dies and his younger brother, Charles, takes his place. In 1618 Mary marries

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