Significance Of Pearl In The Scarlet Letter

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In this novel, The Scarlet Letter, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne, one character stands out above all. Pearl, the walking scarlet letter, at several points in this novel, serves as a bridge between sin and happiness. Unity is a key part in this novel, and is displayed by and through Pearl at various parts of this novel. Pearl is constantly used to symbolize several different things, and is essential to understanding each individual character and also essential to understanding the novel in general. The illegitimate child of Dimmesdale and Hester, Pearl, is an interesting character who plays a large role in this novel. Many traits are exhibited by Pearl as she continues to grow up such as the outgoing nature she has, in seeking the true meaning …show more content…
She is the reminder of Hester and Dimmesdale’s sin, and when she is around she refuses to let them live their adultery ways down. Not only by the ways she dresses, is she a reminder, but also the way she acts around Hester. For example, “Seen in the brook, once more, was the shadowy wrath of Pearl 's image, crowned and girdled with flowers, but stamping its foot, wildly gesticulating, and, in the midst of all, still pointing its small forefinger at Hester 's bosom!” (Chapter 19, pg. 200). This is Pearl not recognizing her mother without her scarlet letter on her bosom, so by doing this Pearl is symbolizing that no matter if Hester takes off this letter, she still is an adulterer and cannot get rid of that past of hers. Pearl does not only remind Hester, but also she attempts to get Dimmesdale to reveal his sins at various points. Pearl constantly asks Dimmesdale to go on the scaffold with them or to walk with them, and if he does that Pearl will allow him to kiss her. The “kiss” will allow Dimmesdale to accept his fate, and also allow Pearl to have a true, loyal father. Not until she receives that kiss, Pearl sees Dimmesdale as the Black Man, and nothing …show more content…
Happiness is seen through Pearl and in Pearl too. Dimmesdale confesses the truth about being Pearls unfaithful father, and due to that he seems to find a peace finally through dying. Before his death, Dimmesdale constantly seemed unhealthy, unstable, and just visibly upset. When he went up to go give the truth about what had happened, he walked up looking like a new man, and the reader can tell this burden was holding him down before, and in order to find happiness he had to let go of his sins. “Pearl kissed his lips. A spell was broken. The great scene of grief, in which the wild infant bore a part, had developed all her sympathies; and as her tears fell upon her father 's cheek, they were the pledge that she would grow up amid human joy and sorrow, nor for ever do battle with the world, but be a woman in it. Towards her mother, too, Pearl 's errand as a messenger of anguish was all fulfilled.”(Ch. 23, Pg. 257) This quote illustrates the ultimate sign of happiness in the novel because it showed that this kiss had ended the previous life of sins, and constant burdens, and had started a life of love and cheerfulness. If Pearl had gotten taken away, no one would have found happiness because the “A” on Hester’s bosom was not a big enough reminder of their sins. Pearl was a living reminder, and actually helped Dimmesdale confess and

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