Medicine In The Middle Ages Essay

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War, medicine, and religion broadly summarizes the Middle Ages. Bloodlines and culture clashed as the Roman empire fell, and time stood still as large, Eastern european civilizations crumbled with systematic disaster. With no political script to follow, for the first time townsmen experienced a sense of unpreparedness as they saw their rulers fall and be conquered by invaders. Throughout the Middle Ages not only was a monumental shift occurring culturally and politically, but specifically in areas of medicine that challenged religious ideologies. The Middle Ages was a transformative time for religion, healing, and medicine that symbolized the clash of cultures and the fall of the Roman Empire. Analyzing the significance of Black Death and the …show more content…
The Middle Ages’ faults gave the European Renaissance the experience to make significant developments in medicine and science therefore providing better options to diseased individuals and followers of the Catholic church became better educated on nuanced forms of treatment. All in all, the Middle Ages was a transformative time for religion, healing, and medicine that symbolized the clash of cultures and the fall of the Roman Empire. The journey of the Middle Ages contested how societies govern their communities through religious ideologies and the consequences of doing so without recognizing the importance of healing in religion. I believe that Black Death would not have been as disastrous as it was if the Catholic church stood unified in their beliefs and did not discriminate against those who did not have faith in God and were sinners. With the Middle Ages being in the past, our present society has made medical and religious developments to intersectionally tackle has to properly diagnose patients and treat them

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