Significance Of Loneliness In Of Mice And Men

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The ever so famous Albert Einstein once said, “It is strange to be known so universally but yet still be so lonely”, meaning that even though you are physically surrounded by people you can still be so lonely. In Of Mice and Men, a novel, written by John Steinbeck, the reader follows George and Lennie though their chase for the American Dream; working where they can find a job to save enough money for their own ranch. Along the way we meet characters who prove that during this time mostly everyone chasing the Dream is lonely. The story is based in a town in California called Soledad, which then translates to loneliness. This small representation is relevant to the story Of Mice and Men because throughout the story many characters are shown …show more content…
Lennie is not like every other worker of the ranch, he is a burly large man capable of doing any tough work, however he is also mentally disabled. Although George is Lennie’s companion and always with him, Lennie can be viewed as a lonely man. The way Lennie’s mind work is equivalent to that of a child’s due to his disabilities. Back in the time of this book, mental disabilities were not as accepted as they are in today’s time. Most of the men believe that he “cuckoo” or as Crooks says, “Jus’ nuts” and he is almost shunned from being with them. Lennie does not have the same thought process of most other men and because of that it makes Lennie feel as though he is isolated from the rest of the men. He cannot do the same thing such as play horseshoes and go into town. This isolation causes Lennie to feel lonely. When Crooks asks, “Sometimes he talks and you just don’t know what the hell he’s talking about?” Lennie replies that “Yeah... Sometimes”. (Steinbeck 70) Lennie’s childlike mind makes him feels as though no one else understands him and no one understands him. The only person Lennie feels as if truly understands him is George. Even George gets a bit aggravated with him and can make him feel as if he is alone, “When I think of the swell time I could have without you, I go nuts.” (Steinbeck 12) Lennie cannot help but feel different from the rest due to no one …show more content…
Candy has lost his hand due to working on the ranch and is now forced to only work little jobs as a swamper due to being disabled. Candy’s dog is old and on the edge of death, not really useful for much and all the men believe, “that dog aint no good to himself” (Steinbeck 45). This dog is the only possession that Candy has and he feels that he is much like that dog, old and useless. Candy is afraid that just like that dog people will soon feel that there “aint nothing left of him” (Steinbeck 47). Since Candy is so old and no longer filled with life like the others he feels that he is alone, no one wants him and or needs him anymore. Now that they have killed of his dog, and he soon will have to stop working, and has no family Candy is afraid he will be overcome with loneliness and isn’t sure what he will do. Candy tries to stop this by agreeing to join George and Lennie on their piece of land. He tells them “I’d make a will a will an’ leave my share to you guys in case I kick off, cause I aint got no relatives nor nothing.” (Steinbeck 59) Candy has nothing to live for once he gets too old to work, no dog, no family, and no

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