The Pros And Cons Of DNA Profiling

Improved Essays
Introduction
Several countries around the world maintain a database dedicated to storing DNA profiles of individuals. The primary purpose of a DNA database is to ease the identification process of suspects during criminal investigations. Despite the intention to do good, the concept of a DNA database is vulnerable to a number of complications and repercussions, affecting the government, general public and crime detectives.

Biological Significance
DNA Profiling is a forensic process utilised to identify individuals by the characteristics of their DNA. It differentiates from other forensic identification processes because it remains the same overtime, unlike fingerprints and has a higher accuracy than biometric iris scanners. The first methods used for DNA profiling for finding out genetics involved restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The method involves DNA to be collected from cells and cut into small pieces using a restriction enzyme. This generates thousands of DNA fragments of differing sizes and then separated on the basis of size using gel electrophoresis. However, this technique is
…show more content…
The invasion of privacy and forced participation is associated with databases containing DNA profiles. There is an uncertainty of where the intimate information is stored and whether or not it gets used without permission. The information from a DNA profile could be utilised by stalkers in order to track individuals and their relatives through a form of biological tagging or ‘bio surveillance’. DNA of an individual is left everywhere, therefore it can be utilised in order to attempt to establish where they have been (Forensic Genetics Policy Initiative, 2016). Furthermore, health insurance companies may be able to access the confidential medical history of an individual by analysing their DNA profile in order to refuse

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Despite this, small samples are sent to multiple independent labs, which helps to reduce the possibility of an error which affect the final results. As DNA evidence is being passed through multiple labs, the individual’s private DNA information has the potential to be used in different crimes. However, it is stated in an article on “Forensic Databases: benefits and ethical and social costs” that, “Public support has been presumed on the grounds that all law-abiding people want criminals to be caught and convicted and the ‘innocent’ have nothing to fear from DNA technology.” (Forensic Databases: benefits and ethical and social costs, British Medical Bulletin, 2015). It is clear that most of society demands for criminals to be found and people who are deemed not guilty should have nothing to worry…

    • 1264 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In today’s society the use of deoxyribonucleic acid, known as DNA; is the basic building block of life and has aided in identifying criminals and solving major crimes (Houck and Siegel). But on the other hand DNA has also proven many individuals to be innocent of a crime. The information that inside of one’s DNA set in an organism…

    • 2387 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In conducting the DNA test, the criminalist is able to extract a genetic “fingerprint,” which can then be compared with the genetic fingerprint of a DNA sample taken from the accused (Garland, 2011 p 135). Both DNA evidence and blood grouping evidence are forms of statistical proof –DNA evidence being the most useful in determining identity. For example, blood grouping evidence may narrow the range of other potential suspects with the same blood type to one out of two hundred, whereas DNA evidence may, as a practical matter, eliminate any possibility that there exists another potential perpetrator by identifying the specific genetic “makeup” of the accused (Garland, 2011 p…

    • 1066 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    For this reason, DNA fingerprinting has been useful in identifying “John and Jane Does” victims who are unknown. Consequently, the World Trade Center tragedy called for genetic analysis on an unprecedented scale (Marieb, 2009, p.459). In the same way, suspects can be proven that they were at the scene of the crime. In some states certain criminal offenders have to provide DNA samples, which are classified and stored (Marieb 2009 p. 459). Getting DNA samples can also prove that some people are truly innocent about ten people were released from death row, after genetic evidence freed them.…

    • 752 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    For this purpose, Taq polymerase is used often. Elongation:- A temperature of 343 to 347 Kelvin is usually necessary for this step to make sure complementary strands have been founded by all the single-stranded DNA templates . Advantages of PCR technique. 1.Amplifies DNA: PCR is a great technique for DNA testing.Very tiny samples are being used for identifying the DNA of individuals. This device helps in amplifying whichever small amounts of the DNA attained.…

    • 994 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It also can be cloned into plasmids. PCR is used in many fields of medicine, molecular biology research, medical diagnostics, and ecology. It is fast and inexpensive technique used to amplify DNA and RNA fragments by 107 times. The polymerase chain reaction was…

    • 916 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Abstract DNA recombination is basically generation of the new DNA sequence in genome by exchange of DNA strands. Recombination generally but not necessarily occurs between similar DNA sequences and provides genetic variation, genome integrity [1]. There are four main ways being identified to produce recombinant DNA; homologous recombination in which physical exchange of DNA sequences occur between the homologous chromosomes, illegitimate recombination occurs between DNA sequences sharing low sequence similarity, site specific recombination require recombination enzymes that specifically bound short nucleotide sequence where cleave and rejoining occurs. The last class is transposition in which mobile DNA element move from one location to target…

    • 1692 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Genetic Database Analysis

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In the past, DNA databases have typically only contained the genetic information from convicted criminals; genetic databases have proven to be useful, as the rate of solved crimes continue to increase due to their involvement (Graham, 2007). A genetic database will also improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and expedite personalized medical care by providing a better understanding of gene interactions (Hadden, 2000, p. 542). In fact, eighty-four percent of the 4,659 Americans surveyed in a 2007 study said that they would be comfortable giving genetic information for the purpose of seeing how individuals with and without genetic illness live their lives. Knowing that this large group of people is in support of such genetic research shows promise for the future of genetic databases. Genetic databases have the potential to be used for pharmacogenetics for disease treatment and the safer prescription of drugs to patients (Patrinos & Drell, 1997, p. 5).…

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    DNA In Forensics

    • 913 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Based on the existence of biological evidence, DNA tests is vital in ensuring that the criminal justice system is fair and accurate (justice.gov, 2014). DNA in Forensics can be used to identify criminals in cases where the suspect is known and also in cases where the suspect is not known. For example, DNA sample from a suspect who has been arrested can be directly compared with DNA sample from the crime scene; on the other hand, DNA samples from the crime scene can be matched with DNA samples archived from other crime sense and already prosecuted cases. Although the DNA collection and analysis system needs great improvement, the system has been used successfully used to prevent the most heinous and violent crimes form taking place and has also helped convict most dangerous criminals involved in a series of different crimes (justice.gov, 2014). In cases of aggravated assaults, the use of DNA in forensics has helped provide evidence for most cases that had no witness available.…

    • 913 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    DNA Fingerprinting

    • 1976 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Introduction In the United States a suspect in a crime is innocent until they are proven in court of law to be guilty beyond doubt(Cornell web), for now at least. This need to prove guilt in a suspect means the use of DNA to determine if the suspect was at least present at the crime scene is a powerful tool because no one person can change their DNA at will. The use of DNA as way to identify people has it 's origins in the United Kingdom because of a technique created by Dr. Alex Jeffreys used to relate DNA to each other and to DNA found at a scene(Herrera 74). This process is called DNA fingerprinting(Herrera 74) and is used in criminal forensics to help prove both guilt and innocence in suspects. It works both to ways because the results are very specific to DNA and will not give provide the same DNA in two people unless they are genetic twins.…

    • 1976 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays