Sigmund Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory

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Psychoanalysis is one of the therapeutic techniques that is used by psychotherapist, which evaluates and treat individuals with behavioral disturbances. The theories of psychoanalysis are credited to psychiatrist Sigmund Freud. Psychoanalytic theory was developed working with individuals with mental illness by Sigmund Freud. This theory was influenced during the twentieth century. Sigmund Freud inspired many therapists and psychologists, which many have expanded their own ideas and theories of psychoanalysis.
The Foundations of Psychoanalysis
Form the beginning, psychoanalysis was distinct from psychological thought in subject matter, goals, and methods. The subject matter is psychopathology, or abnormal behavior, which is neglected
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These theories explained why the predictions of each subject matter came to be recognized. To examine the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Alfred Adler, these theories give a more thorough examination of the subject matter. Adler believed that individuals past influence the choices an individual makes in everyday life, where Freud believed in sexual tension was an essential human drive. Alder thought individuals were driven by his or her relationships with others. Both Freud and Alder agreed that an individual personality were developed within the first six years of life. Freudian theory are more recognized for the five stages of human development. This theory came from Freud’s observation of individual recollection in therapy of an individual life. In Freud’s work, he states that children were not directly observed. Sigmund Freud has been criticized throughout his years for his character and his scientific theories, which his metaphor for describing personality holds truth. Psychoanalysis has three main components that consists of a method of investigating the mind and the way the mind thinks, a set of theories that is systemized about the behavior of an individual, and a method of treatment of the emotional illness and psychological of an individual. The treatment methods given by Sigmund Freud …show more content…
The types of method of Freud’s psychotherapy is still used in psychiatry today. The objections that has leveled the traditional psychoanalysis has both been criticized for the method and the lack of theoretical theory. Many therapist and psychologist of the modern study has suggested the psychoanalysis and the data it produces has no reliability without proven evidence. Freud’s theories may not seem liable and up to standard for treating individuals, critics have pointed out Freud’s theoretical models have problems with traditional psychoanalysis. Sigmund Freud analytical point of view have intended to reach some or all of his analysis, which psychoanalyst request sessions that are frequent with an individual for over a period of time. Today the cost of this method compels most individuals or patients to seek other forms of psychiatric care. Traditional psychoanalysis involved a distance between therapist and individual. In recent years, many patients prefer to be more interactive with the psychiatrist. The subject of Freud’s analysis has fallen into disuse, even for psychiatrist that still practice psychoanalysis. There are more focus on problems the individual have and is currently experiencing. The early twenty fist century, various kinds of psychoanalysis continues to be practiced but the theory of psychoanalysis has been overshadowed by other

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