Sigmund Freud's Influence On Modern Psychology

Improved Essays
In a time where the mentally ill were misunderstood and under examined, one theorist strived to answer questions about the behavior and the mental process of the human mind. This well-known theorist known as “father of psychiatry”, Sigmund Freud lived in an era of reform regarding the mentally ill. It wasn’t until the mid-1800s scientists provided important new understandings of how behavior can influence the brain and the nervous system. This influential period guided Freud’s ideas and theories about the human mind. The human mind is a challenging aspect to explain in a scientific and effective manner. Many early philosophers have attempted to explain this difficult science of the mind using logic and critical thinking. Yet, logic has limitations in its approach lacking scientific evidence, but rather relying on subjective evaluations. When discussing theorists Freud can be considered widely recognized for his research, evidence, addiction and drug use, in addition to, providing influential theories that still impact the world today even in the healthcare system.
However, even though Freud played a vital role in understanding various influences of
…show more content…
Freud’s contributions to the psychology field have led to advancements in understanding the connections between life experiences, and emotional influences on mental health. Freud suffered from depression relying on cocaine to alter his moods he was an addict, yet this did not stop him from becoming influential theorist. His impact can even be seen today in modern medical treatment as the focus of health care includes the mind body approach. Theorists play a vital role in the evolution of psychology taking difficult questions and proposing logical and scientific approaches attempting to provide rationalization to uncertainties about behavior and the mental

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    wish to change it in accordance with the interests and desires of the vast majority” (Fromm, “Greatness” 134). Another reason why psychoanalysis is so significant to the world of psychology and modern-day psychology is because the method of therapy for psychoanalysis is the “major research instrument for investigating the unconscious” (Bocock 129). Psychology today has been heavily shaped by the basics of psychoanalysis and what Sigmund Freud has discovered and taught while learning about psychoanalysis. There are many different opinions and meanings of psychoanalysis, but Sigmund Freud’s meaning of psychoanalysis is the most important because he pursued to reach his goals of the development of psychoanalysis. To Freud, psychoanalysis is a…

    • 2043 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Sigmund Freud has been criticized throughout his years for his character and his scientific theories, which his metaphor for describing personality holds truth. Psychoanalysis has three main components that consists of a method of investigating the mind and the way the mind thinks, a set of theories that is systemized about the behavior of an individual, and a method of treatment of the emotional illness and psychological of an individual. The treatment methods given by Sigmund Freud…

    • 1258 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    He focused on different states of the mind, such as unconsciousness. Freud relied on a local sexual repression issue to create theories about human behavior all together. Although many people would agree that Sigmund Freud’s theories are controversial, he is said to be one of the most influential scientists with great work concerning psychology. His theories and ideas of psychoanalysis…

    • 1866 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Originally, our team anticipated choosing a researcher in a psychological field pertaining to mental disorders such as Asperger’s Syndrome or Autism. However, while delving into the psychological department of research, we encountered a notable researcher by the name of Mark Goldman. His research is based around substance abuse and alcoholism. While our initial topic of research (Asperger’s/Autism) provided great insight and information for an excellent presentation, the dangers behind substance abuse and alcoholism which can affect people our age made this researcher very appealing. We live in a fast-paced world, filled with vices and unruly decisions.…

    • 1418 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Beginning in Europe and spreading to the United States, Freud’s new and controversial theories kick started the development of modern psychology and the transformation of beliefs surrounding the cause of mental illness. With the publication of The Unconscious Mind at the turn of the 20th century, and further works being published into 1920s, Freud’s approach to mental illness and understanding human behavior greatly shaped the beginning of the 20th century (psychfreud). Sigmund Freud was the founder of the psychoanalytic approach in psychology. Psychoanalysis a method used for treating the mentally ill as well as a theory that explains human behavior (PSYCHFREUD). Focusing on the unconscious mind as well as dream interpretation, psychoanalysis, also known as the “talking cure”, put an emphasis on patients verbally expressing their problems, feelings, and ailments (same as above).…

    • 1366 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Most people will start using drugs through peer pressure or from some sort of traumatic experience within their lives. I think that being an addicted is even more psychological when you look at how people can come off of drugs. Once again referring back to the article “Is addiction a brain disease” you can see that Jacob Sullum who is an author used within the article makes great points to how social cues make people stop using. Sullum states that drug addicts can see that the drugs are undermining their sense of themselves and the control of their own destinies so they stop using. He states that this behavior shows that drugs chemicals do not take away someone’s free will.…

    • 994 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Sigmund Freud: He Puts the Psycho in Psychosexuality The human brain is one of the most cryptic and fascinating objects in existence. Although technology and research have allowed us to uncover the anatomical mysteries of the brain, that wasn’t enough for Sigmund Freud. Freud was fascinated with the dark and twisted side of the brain; in fact, he even created a theory about sexuality at a young age called the Psychosexual Development Theory. While Freud was considered a hero at the time for his breakthroughs and accomplishments, the acceptance of his ideas has decreased over time and it now appears that he likely suffered from many of the same conditions he strived to treat. Freud’s obsession with psychology stemmed from his initial study of neurology.…

    • 897 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I will be looking at the strengths and limitations of two different types of psychological approaches when used for research. The two approaches that I will be looking at are the Psychodynamic Approach as well as the Behaviourist approach. Firstly I will be looking at the Psychodynamic Approach. A strength of using this approach is that although it and a lot of its practises are seen as highly controversial it has had great influence on the world of psychology. An example of this would be the psychodynamic research methods of Sigmund Freud and the many psychologists it has inspired over the years.…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Benefit Of Placebo Effect

    • 1828 Words
    • 8 Pages

    For instance, psychiatry researchers have looked at diagnostic changes in research participants who receive placebo control treatment for depression. Some humans could be more like minded to agree on the effects of the placebo due to their current mind state. In a low-power study, researchers from the University of Texas at San Antonio were able to show that in people with depression, both placebo effect and treatments with fluoxetine resulted in similar changes in glucose system our measured by positron discharge tomography filter. The mechanics of the placebo are quite interesting to say the least that some subjects will respond while others might not even show a response. Even though the evidence in a real situation the things we can find from the placebo effect is how positive emotions and thoughts can work to wellbeing and…

    • 1828 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When diagnosed, the idea was to prescribe a specific drug for a specific mental illness. Because this was a much more organized way to find a remedy for an individual’s mental illness, the standards of treatment and diagnosis of mental illness was heavy reliant upon taxonomization. (C) Through the use of psychoanalysis techniques, Freud believed that the mental illness his patients were discomforted by resulted in hidden sexual desires and fantasies, which produced conflicts from deep within their unconscious, because such thoughts were not in line with every day social norms and cultural constraints. Freud - malfunction of mental function or of neurological…

    • 788 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics