Sigmund Freud's Psychosexual Development

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Though there was noted inconsistency with regards to the literature reviewed of the early social histories of Sigmund Freud and Karen Horney (nee Danielson), observed similarities did exist between these two theorists that later held distinction in their approach to personality. The theorists’ mothers were significantly younger than their fathers, and of second and third marriage to the fathers’; Freud and Horney had one biological sibling of the opposite sex, as well as multiple half-siblings. As young children, they were regarded as bright and found themselves entering the field of medicine where they both engaged in professional development amongst experienced mentors in the field of neurophysiology (Josef Breuer with Freud) and psychoanalysis (Karl Abraham with Horney) (Boeree, 2014; Freidman & Schustack, 2012). While their professional life represented the study and implementation of psychoanalysis, Karen Horney personal experiences changed her view of Freud’s perspective in turn offering a neo-analysis that emphasized the ego as well as the influence of society and culture.
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The complex relates to the idea that the boy has sexualized feelings towards his mother as a result feels in competition with his father. The concept continues to explain that while he may not be able to fit within the role of his father to mother, the boy in this stage begins to identify with his fathers (e.g. male) (Friedman et.al., 2012). Conversely, penis envy is directed towards the girl who notes the higher position that the boy holds within society, which is said to be indicated through differences in genitalia. And while the boy fixates for his mother in the Oedipus complex, the girl transfer her fixation onto her father “in attempt to capture a penis” (Friedman et.al.,

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