Sigmund Freud And Carl Jung And The Emergence Of A Psychodynamic Therapy

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Psychodynamic therapy originated as a divergence from psychoanalytic therapy and theory when Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung disagreed on multiple elements of theory and how therapy should be conducted. Jung did not agree with Freud’s belief that sexuality was the main motivational principle for human beings. Jung also felt Freud was mistaken regarding a lack of importance based on spiritual and transpersonal elements of the psyche in psychoanalytic theory (Safran & Kriss, 2014, p. 28). These disagreements led to the emergence of a psychoanalytic-type therapy without certain characteristics that define psychoanalysis, including the extensive time spent in therapy and the traditional on-the-couch model (Safran & Kriss, 2014, p. 35). In psychodynamic …show more content…
This relationship between Amy and her therapist will foster an opportunity for change. To form this alliance, Amy and the therapist must agree about the tasks and goals of therapy (Safran & Kriss, 2014, p. 36). The therapist must earn Amy’s trust, show empathy, and remain neutral and anonymous, take caution in being overly directive, and ultimately make Amy feel understood. Trust in the therapist and collaboration in the agreement of tasks and goals of therapy will influence one another over the course of therapy (Safran & Kriss, 2014, p. …show more content…
35). Empathy should be embodied by the clinician in their interactions with the client. This is considered “the most fundamental intervention” (Safran & Kriss, 2014, p. 39) in the contemporary psychodynamic perspective. Viewed through a psychodynamic lens, the therapeutic alliance should be a collaborative relationship with the client. The role of the therapist in this approach is directly gleaned from the psychodynamic therapy described in the book. There are six core characterizations for the therapeutic stance, five of which are referenced above. These include: refraining from being overly directive, maintaining anonymity, staying neutral, showing empathy for Amy without blaming her for her situation, and helping Amy bring her unconscious motivations to light (Safran & Kriss, 2014, p. 35). This approach defines successful treatment as a conscious awareness of Amy’s unconscious motivations, an understanding of how Amy’s childhood has impacted her current relationships and feeling of unfulfillment, and determining if there is a personality change. Psychodynamic therapies are supported by an ever-increasing body of empirical evidence. These results show a clear efficacy, and even a continued impact after termination. Psychodynamic approaches have been studied in both randomized clinical trials and naturalistic studies, but more is

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