Should High Schools Be Allowed To Punish Students For Cyberbullying

820 Words 4 Pages
2015 is no Jestons future, but we are definitely living in a modern era. Items like cell phones and the Internet, which makes communication hundreds of times faster than in the past, are incredibly common. A relative can easily post “Happy birthday!” on a person’s Facebook page, or a daughter can send a quick “I’m leaving” text to her mom. Unfortunately, not all of this new cyber communication is being used for good; instead, teenagers have taken up bullying over technology. Most schools do not currently have the authority to punish students for cyberbullying, which doesn’t help to correct the issue. High schools should be allowed to punish students for cyberbullying because the school has an obligation to protect its students and teach them …show more content…
Public servants are meant to do the public good by protecting citizens, and even though cyberbullying victimizes students, teachers are not currently able to protect them from this harm. Also, teachers should have the ability to control what affects their domain. Scholastic.com explains it as such: “School is the center of kids ' lives. Online harassment may take place on nights and at home, but the fallout is often seen at school and can interfere with the educational environment. In the worst case, students are so worried about cyberbullying that they can 't focus on their studies or are afraid to come to school.” Cyberbullying negatively affects the learning capability of the victim and every other student in that classroom. If schools were given the ability to do their duties as public servants and punish cyberbullying themselves, students could be saved from themselves and others, and be allowed to blossom as individuals once …show more content…
In fact, bullying is already punished in schools, and cyberbullying is no different than bullying: both actions hurt other students significantly and in common ways. Cyberbullying is a real crime, even though there’s no official name for it (yet). Legally, cyberbullying can be considered a form of harassment, online impersonation, disruptive activities (CriminalDefenseLawyer.com), and disorderly conduct, the latter being defined as “conduct that disturbs the peace or endangers the morals, health, or safety of a community,” on TheFreeDictionary.com. Cyberbullying does disturb the peace and safety of students in school who fall victim to this crime, for they fear the cyberbully. These real crimes can range anywhere from a class B misdemeanor to a felony, which means jail time for the perpetrator just for saying a few harsh words on the Internet. In addition, Congress is currently working on making cyberbullying in its entirety a federal crime, according to Wake Forest Law Review. Punishing students in high school for cyberbullying could stop the cyberbullying in its tracks as well as preventing students from escalating up to serious crimes. The suspension serves to teach the perpetrator about how real consequences are, and suspension from high school seems a meager punishment compared to the

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