Shinto Religion

Improved Essays
VI. What do they consider the chief aim of man?
Despite not having a set system of beliefs, Shintoists strive for a few key concepts throughout their devotion and lives (Toropov 181). Firstly, Shinto devotees have a long-lasting wish for peace among men and Kami (Religion: Shinto). Shinto is a very local tradition in which many Shintoist become more concerned about their own local shrine rather than the religion as a whole (Religion: Shinto). In this way, the goal of many Shintoists is to nourish the local Shinto culture of their village or town in order to pass down the traditions and continue the Shinto legacy (Toropov 181). Furthermore, another goal of a Shinto devotee is to become reincarnated as a Kami (Religion: Shinto). To do this one must be outstanding and accomplish many great things, he/she must be distinguished and honored (Religion: Shinto).
VII. How do they attain salvation (heaven)? Do they believe in hell?
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However, strictly speaking they do not believe in an attainable salvation that would lead them to heaven (Terry 40). Shinto “does not split the universe into a natural physical world and a supernatural transcendent world.” (Religion: Shinto). Furthermore, Shinto regards everything as a unified creation and does not have a western belief of the separation of body and spirit (Religion: Shinto). Spirit being exist in the same world human beings exist, just on a different plane of transcendence (Religion: Shinto). This different plane of transcendence is often referred to as the “heavens” but as far as western ideology paints heaven, Shinto has nothing comparable (Religion:

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