Sherlock Holmes And Hercule Poirot Analysis

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Throughout the ages, mystery writing has intrigued readers around the world. With captivating characters and a suspenseful plot, mystery books appeal to one’s sense of curiosity as well as provide a daring adventure for the reader to delve into without abandoning the safety of their seat. The mystery genre has borne some of the most fascinating characters in the world, two of the most recognized being Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. Though Sherlock Holmes, created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Hercule Poirot, created by Agatha Christie, are both famed intellectual detectives and share many aspects, there are also many distinctions that distinguish their characters from one another, the most prominent examples being their appearance, their …show more content…
His chin, too, had the prominence and squareness which mark the man of determination” (Doyle 8). Sherlock Holmes might be a brilliant detective, but he definitely has character flaws. He is condescending and has an ego that borders on outright arrogance, though at times it is justifiable. He takes particular delight in baffling law enforcement and police inspectors with his superior deductions. Holmes is presented as cold and aloof, but one can appreciate his passion for his work when he is following a case. He has a flair for showmanship that is clearly exhibited in the beginning of The Hound of the Baskervilles, where Holmes allows Watson to examine aloud the walking stick that belongs to Dr. Mortimer. Even though he knows that most of Watson’s deductions are misguided, he permits Watson to make a fool of himself while he was attempting to employ the methods he had so often seen Holmes himself use. Only after Watson is finished does Holmes interject with “I am afraid, my dear Watson, that most of your conclusions were erroneous. When I said …show more content…
Captain Arthur Hasting describes Hercule Poirot in The Mysterious Affair At Styles with the following: “He was hardly more than five feet four inches but carried himself with great dignity. His head was exactly the shape of an egg, and he always perched it a little on one side. His moustache was very stiff and military. Even if everything on his face was covered, the tips of moustache and the pink-tipped nose would be visible. The neatness of his attire was almost incredible; I believe a speck of dust would have caused him more pain than a bullet wound. Yet this quaint dandified little man who, I was sorry to see, now limped badly, had been in his time one of the most celebrated members of the Belgian police” (Christie 8). Hercule Poirot is quite vain about his appearance, and he comes off as slightly snobby or arrogant about his own abilities. Because he is independently wealthy and used to a life of luxury his successful career has made him slightly arrogant over numerous the years. In Death On The Nile, Poirot declares with hubris that “I am not a middle man. I am a top man” (123). Hercule Poirot “feels” his way through a case, even though he claims he “thinks”. He uses more of his knowledge of human nature to help him solve investigations. While investigating, Poirot uses phrases such as, “I was not satisfied,” “it didn’t ring true,” “it struck me as rather odd” or

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