Shah Reza Pahlavi: The Iranian Oil Revolution

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From 1941 to 1979, the Iranian oil nation was lead by Shah Reza Pahlavi. In Persian, the old Iranian language, Shah means king. The Shah’s full name was Mohammed Reza Pahlavi. The oil in Iran was very valuable, and the Shah used this ingredient to start to prepare his dish. When Reza Pahlavi became the chef, he started to trade his ingredients with America. He was able to make a large amount of money and support his staff. In the 1940’s, his restaurant was up and running, he allowed women to vote and work, and produced a non-religious kitchen, unlike what the staff was used to from it’s previous chef, Abbas Ali. Even though the Shah granted a lot of rights to the nation and created a wealthy economy, he was ignorant to the fact that Iran is …show more content…
Khomeini was not of a fan of the Shah’s ways, as he had publicly called him a “miserable man”. This is another main ingredient in a revolution, to be a tyrant, and use tyranny to expose the regime. Ayatollah had a major impact on the nation at the time, mainly because he fought for the idea of an Islamic constitution. The Shah was not happy with Ayatollah’s actions so he imprisoned him. Because the nation supported Ayatollah, Iranians were starting riots throughout Iran. On November 4th, 1964, Ayatollah was exiled from Iran. Ayatollah fled to Iraq, in a city named An Najaf, close to Iran. From here he was able to continue to share his idea with the Iranian nation. He did this by sending tape recordings of himself. In the 1970’s, because the Shah was angered by the Islamic fundamentalists, he held a celebration of the 2,500th anniversary of the Persian monarchy. On the same day, March 19, 1976, he replaced the Islamic calendar with the traditional Persian calendar. This caused disagreement and anger in the people of Iran. This is key in cooking a revolution, the tension between the government and the nation creates a unique flavour in the revolution. Demonstrations are also important, they provide a nice texture at the end. For example in 1978, many anti-shah groups caused trouble in major cities of Iran such as, Tehran, Isfahan, Ahvaz, and Qom. During this time and because of the Shah’s actions Ayatollah’s popularity grew. In December the army resisted orders from the Shah, on January 16th, 1979, the Shah fled from the kitchen. In February 1, 1979, the religious leader, gained control over the kitchen. He had returned after 15 years of exile, 2 weeks after the Shah had fled the

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