Sexism In The 1920s

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The United States: A culturally diverse, melting pot of immigrants. Throughout the decades of evolutionary advancement, society progressed in a plethora of movements and ideologies. It would appear to the ignorant eye that roughly since the 1920s, America has been precocious. This in and of itself is false; not completely false, however, when contrasting the constraints of sexism at the time of the 1920s with 2016, the lack of difference is appalling. New York City, 1920, the jazz age loomed and rose with its freshness impacting the definition of the Flapper, and how it defined women. Hemlines shortened, dresses flaunted glitz and glamour, hair was bobbed, and cosmetics were beginning to lose their clandestine status; women were experiencing …show more content…
The concept of an employed woman, provided of course that she was not married or had a family, did reach a mutual understanding regarding the tolerance for having women in the workplace. Education, through reading, writing, and mathematics, administered a certain level of appetite for corporate employment: Clerical and secretarial work was the highest a female amalgamate in the spectrum of male-dominant working environments. The other most common, and almost trendy, source of income that someone of the feminine sex could acquire were retail positions in department stores; Along with the modifications to the appearance during the 1920s, department stores hit their first major boom of profit due to the desires of women wanting to assimilate themselves in all things associated with flappers. For the lower-class woman, most likely a mother and wife as well, factory work was very much a part of income sourcing. Contrasting all of these specimens of professional women, the modern women of today 's society have only advanced slightly; despite all that people go through, regardless of gender or socioeconomic background, females are still hawk-eyed closely when seeking education for professional purposes. For …show more content…
Society and media construct and influence the bases of what configures their ideal female, whether that equates to the physiological build of the Kim Kardashian, Angelina Jolie, or Taylor Swift types, it does not matter because it isn 't right. In addition, the slurry of mixed messages about what to eat and when to consume it, are the plaque of eating disorders. While third world countries such as Burundi, according to a 2014 statistic which illustrates that 73% of the population is emaciated, are going hungry, the United States is demonizing and isolating forms of macro-nutrients and in extreme cases, eliminating them all together: Orthorexia is a newly coined branch of disordered eating, individuals who engage in orthorexic behavior have the fear of unhealthy foods, which can mean anything processed and non-plant-based, are obsessed with food, and often are consuming a vast amount of supplements. This is unacceptable and the only source of blame is the marketing industry. Everything is about money and it does not matter if young girls and women become vastly preoccupied with sustenance, to the extent of hospitalization or worse. Previously I discussed the STEM program, which advocates for women 's involvement in scientific areas of study, and its benefits of supporting females who

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