Serial Killers: A Theoretical Analysis

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There are different levels of intelligence and writing that focus on select audiences. Authors write in a wide variety of styles to capture the attentions of different people. A magazine would use bold text and short articles to cater to the attention spans of average everyday people, usually making bold statements and using risqué photos. As for a scholarly article, the audience would be a different, higher education normally. (Along with professionals because there would be language that the general public may not understand.) For the subject on if personality disorders can be used to predict serial killers, the different sources would act as different educational experiences. An audience may learn something new from either. The amount, extent, …show more content…
The second quote states “We have much more to learn about the neuroscience of violent and antisocial behavior, but what we know already must surely influence our views on evil. As our scientific knowledge expands, it seems that the space for moral evil contracts” (Spence 2). Both of these articles have good information, but can you tell which one is which? The quote from Anderson is from a scholarly article and he is careful to speak in a way that contains no bias information. The article was published less than 20 years ago and the information is still relevant today. The quote from Spence who is honorary consultant psychiatrist to Sheffield Care Trust and a reader in psychiatry at the University of Sheffield comes from New Scientist magazine that has been in publication since 1956. The information provided is well written and informative. These quotes were put together to show that a well-written magazine could be mistaken for a peer-reviewed journal because the information sounds good. A scholarly article is not written for everyday citizens. The information and the specific item set in focus in these articles are focused on specific people in a field or possible college …show more content…
There are books for non-fictional information as well as fictional ‘pleasure reads’, you learn from both but in different ways. Someone will normally pick up a book once they have a vague understanding of a subject or use it to learn. The language is less complex than a scholarly journal but much more advanced than a magazine. A short passage in a book on antisocial personality disorder says that a sufferer may show no concern in their behavior or see any reason for change even after being shown the possible ramifications of such behavior. This is due to the lack of guilt and remorse the sufferers feel (Kernberg 53). This passage should be easy to read for most people. Even if there is a word that a reader may not know there are enough context clues to steer them in the right direction. Knowing if a book is credible about the information provides is sometimes hard to find out, so you have to go beyond the information and focus on who it is that wrote the book and what makes them reliable. The author of the book mentioned is a psychoanalyst and professor of psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College. He has received a Heinz Hartman Award of the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, as well as two other notable awards. Having these honors would make it easy to see that this is a reliable

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