Separation Of Delay In The Vietnam War

1073 Words 5 Pages
Having a separation of powers only redoubles the time it take to resolve issues that are needed to be solved urgently. For example: with three branches withholding almost all power of decisive means for the American people; passing important laws, bills, and making decisions that involve new changes for the people are reviewed over extensively and over-excessively, leading to an unneeded delay over all decisions. The Judicial review is the leading conflicting government power in which the Judicial branch controls that causes an excessive delay over decisions, throughout history it is shown that a separation of powers always leads to an excessive delay in a conflict. It is prominently shown in the War in Afghanistan, the Vietnam War, and the …show more content…
With Lyndon Johnson as president; incompetence to end the war was vast. Even with “a Gallup poll showing only 35 percent of the population approving of Johnson’s handling of the war and a full 50 percent disapproved (the rest had no opinion)”(Vietnam War Protests 3) it wasn’t able to sway congress to end the war quickly and withdraw the troops. As Nixon took office in 1969, he promised to end the war using a method of Vietnamization, instead of quickly ending the war. This decision cost the US, “$173 billion” (Rural America 2), the equivalent if the war was in the present is nearly $770 billion. Because of this issue billions of tax dollars were wasted, and intense protesting arose. Nixon was blamed for what congress didn’t inquire to do immediately. “Congress never forced an immediate end to the war. To the contrary, in 1964, Congress granted the president broad authority to use force, and in the late 1960s and early 1970s it continued to fund military operations after the war had turned into a quagmire”(Zeliter 2), this finally allowed Nixon to end the war. The Vietnam war was shaped by the disagreements between the executive and judicial …show more content…
In virtue of power vested in the executive by the Constitution and the laws, he called forth 75,000 state militia to suppress the unlawful combinations, commanding the persons who composed them to disperse and retire peaceably within twenty days. Lincoln further issued a statement of war aims addressed to the country as a whole. He declared: ‘I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate and aid this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our National Union, and the perpetuity of popular government; and to redress wrongs already long enough endured.’”(Belz

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