Separate But Equal

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Separate but equal was a concept that created false hope for those who,at the time, were discriminated and segregated from whites . This concept created a segregation with no shame. In the academic world this was a major concern for those who suffered segregation. African-Americans were not allowed to attend schools with white Americans. For that reason, major whirls on the topic raised. In order to maintain control, the Board of Education of the U.S decided to take on the concept of “separate but equal”. Schools were to teach African-American children the same way as schools teaching whites. It was not surprising when people discovered that those schools were nothing but completely different than white schools. Non-white schools were given …show more content…
The Supreme Court, then decided to fit all five cases under the name Brown v. Board of Education. Thurgood Marshall deliberately and very determined, fought the case the case before the Court. Marshall pointed out various questioning decisions taken in the “separate but equal” action. However, the most important one was that schools divided by racial reason were everything but equal, and therefore violated the "equal protection clause" of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Also, relying on sociological tests, such as the one performed by social scientist Kenneth Clark, “he also argued that segregated school systems had a tendency to make black children feel inferior to white children, and thus such a system should not be legally permissible.” (McBride) After analyzing various psychological and social tets, it was concluded that racial segregation affected children. It affected them in the way that the interacted socially and even more important the ability to learn whatever was being …show more content…
Chief Justice Warren brought all of the Justices to agree to support a unanimous decision declaring segregation in public schools unconstitutional. On May 14, 1954, he delivered the opinion of the Court, stating that "We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. . ."(McBride) The Supreme court knew that they were to expect major opposition to its ruling, especially in the southern states. For that reason, the Supreme Court did not immediately try to give direction for the implementation and action of its ruling. Rather, it asked the attorney generals of all states with laws who permitted segregation in their public schools to submit plans for how to proceed with desegregation. (Brown v. Board)
Reality is that desegregation was not something accepted immediately by public schools, especially those in the southern states. Many people had deep a deep ignorant hatred against blacks and were determined to stop them from attending school with their white children. Due to the fact that many black children began going to school with white children many disastrous events began, such as the incident of Little

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